MORNING BID – Janet Yellen’s rain (snow) check

February 27, 2014

This is the thing about delaying the new Fed chair’s follow-up testimony by two weeks due to bad weather, you actually make the second hearing something that’s potentially interesting. (It will depend, of course, on whether members of the Senate Committee ask provocative questions, and while you can lead a horse to water, well, you know.)

In the interim two weeks since Janet Yellen last appeared before Congress, the U.S. economic picture has gotten much more muddled. That’s mostly because of poor retail sales and employment figures, and the out-of-control situation in Ukraine which has led to a regional flight of some assets. There’s also been some interesting comments from the likes of Fed Governor Daniel Tarullo, who suggested the Fed should be paying more attention to the formation of asset bubbles and the use of monetary policy to curb them. That anyone is surprised at this shows how pervasive the “Fed put” option has become in the discussion of Fed activities, so we’ve really lowered expectations here.

Meanwhile, Boston Fed head Eric Rosengren said the Fed is looking very closely at activities in emerging markets, which is sort of obvious in a sense but contradicts, if only modestly, Yellen’s thoughts two weeks ago. And really, the Fed’s ability to influence economic activities overseas in some of the world’s developing markets or troubled spots is even weaker than what it can exert over U.S. demand. So maybe it’s just one to grow on.
Either way, Yellen would probably want to comment on the situation, if, again, a smart senator would think to … well, never mind.

Overnight, the situation in the Ukraine has worsened, with armed gunmen taking control of regional government headquarters in Crimea, vowing to be ruled from Russia. The Ukrainian hryvnia continues to sink while the Russian ruble plumbs new five-year lows, surpassing the previous day’s losses, and a bit of risk-off action can be seen in the zloty and a bit of better buying in Treasuries, where the 10-year yield was lately at 2.66 percent. Fund flow figures will be key to watch here to see if overseas flows increase to the U.S. or at least to the developed areas of Western Europe and Japan.

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