Counterparties

MORNING BID — Breaking it down, Fed style

September 17, 2014

It’s all over but the dissection of the Fed statement, due later today, which will follow with a Janet Yellen press conference after the U.S. markets get word of whether the Fed did or did not eliminate the “considerable time” bit from its statement that saw markets go into a tizzy all of Tuesday. At this point the market believes that phrase now may *not* be eliminated, which marks the second reversal in about a week on this point. No matter what, somebody is going to be caught leaning in the wrong direction, but if the latest intelligence is that the Fed’s statement won’t change materially until the October meeting, then the freshest bets are probably in the direction of those betting on that much. So if the statement does cut out that language or modifies it in any way, you could see a selloff in equities, the dollar and bonds.

MORNING BID – Just our imagination

September 10, 2014

Something has changed in the bond market in some ways – but it’s a bit difficult to tease out when you’re talking about yields still near very low levels. But there’s a sense that the San Francisco Fed’s paper on the way in which economists are underestimating the Fed’s own view of interest rates is a game-changer, or maybe it’s just that people are waking up to the idea that the Fed really does have to raise rates eventually, or even more so, that it’s an overreaction to a previous overreaction: backlash to the idea that the August jobs report was so lousy that the Fed was still firmly in “not doing anything ever” mode.

MORNING BID – Sound as a pound

September 9, 2014

Global ructions are dominating asset flows right now, and we’re not even talking about violent events such as the ongoing Russia-Ukraine conflict, the rise of Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, or the Israel-Palestine situation. Right now smaller events – yet uncertain ones – seem to be affecting the larger markets a bit more, contributing to a decided shift in factors that U.S. assets are reacting to.

MORNING BID – Down in the Jackson Hole

August 15, 2014

The markets ease into a traditionally slow period with not much to look forward to other than the Federal Reserve’s Jackson Hole conference due next week, where the highlight, naturally, will be anything Janet Yellen says regarding the state of the labor markets. The chances of the Fed signaling a new shift when it comes to policy are slim – Yellen has proved to be a cautious speaker thus far, interested in furthering Ben Bernanke’s way of telegraphing as much as possible when it comes to policy alterations, and Yellen is more so, her “six months” comment from a few months ago notwithstanding. As Jonathan Spicer and Howard Schneider reported a few days ago, Yellen is much more interested in fighting an inflation war than dealing with a persistent deflationary/lousy economic environment to dominate the headlines, so the expectation should be for lower rates for longer, and not to expect a lot of surprises out of Wyoming next week.

MORNING BID – Shorting a dull market, and other cliches

May 28, 2014

There are a million cliches people lean on to explain some aspect of the market that’s otherwise baffling, and the key one this week – the cliche du semaine – is something along the lines of, “You don’t want to short a dull market.”

MORNING BID – Janet Yellen’s rain (snow) check

February 27, 2014

This is the thing about delaying the new Fed chair’s follow-up testimony by two weeks due to bad weather, you actually make the second hearing something that’s potentially interesting. (It will depend, of course, on whether members of the Senate Committee ask provocative questions, and while you can lead a horse to water, well, you know.)

Morning Bid — The Minutiae of the Minutes

January 8, 2014

December’s last salvo before going into holiday mode was the surprise Federal Reserve decision to trim its monthly $85 billion in bond buying to a more modest (but still enormous) $75 billion, that helped balloon its balance sheet to north of $4 trillion.