Daniel's Feed
Feb 6, 2014
via Breakingviews

Return to U.S. workforce of old a mixed blessing

Photo

By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The recent decline in the U.S. jobless rate to 6.7 percent is flattered by low labor participation. A return to the 2006 level of workforce involvement would mean 8 million more job-seekers and unemployment running over 11 percent. But as a Breakingviews calculator shows, that dramatically overstates the scale of the problem.

Dec 24, 2013
via Breakingviews

U.S. housing recovery could run out of steam

Photo

By Daniel Indiviglio

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The U.S. housing recovery could run out of steam in 2014. Banks are likely to tighten lending standards once new rules come into place. Rising interest rates may drive down home loan volume, too. Cash purchases by investors could set a floor for house prices, but they may not be enough to prevent a major slowdown.

Nov 21, 2013
via Breakingviews

Bitcoin attention may flip its investor base

Photo

By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.
All the official attention being garnered by bitcoin could flip its investor base. Congressional hearings held this week confer a certain sort of legitimacy on the shadowy but high-flying virtual currency. Ardent inflationista and libertarian bitcoin backers won’t much like the arrival of rules and regulations. They could, however, inadvertently attract the masses.

Bitcoin was created as a means of digital payment. Initially, a handful of programmers collected the nerd cash for solving mathematical problems related to network stability and security. Interest now extends far beyond young basement dwellers.

Nov 18, 2013
via Breakingviews

Derivatives detail could sink bank wind-down plans

Photo

By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

A seemingly small derivatives detail could sink global bank wind-down plans. American and European regulators want to standardize contracts to help cross-border lenders fail smoothly. If the problem isn’t fixed, investors could undermine financial stability by calling in swaps. It’s a reminder of how much work still needs to be done to end too big to fail.

Oct 21, 2013
via Breakingviews

Obamacare mess is opportunity for Valley hackfest

Photo

By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The Obamacare mess is an opportunity for a Silicon Valley hackfest. The launch of the new U.S. healthcare law has been plagued by technological glitches. That gives West Coast tech whizzes a chance to muck in.

Oct 9, 2013
via Breakingviews

Obama’s Fed chair pick looks timed to calm market

Photo

By Daniel Indiviglio

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

U.S. President Barack Obama’s pick to be the next Federal Reserve chair looks timed to calm the market. Janet Yellen appears set to get the nod on Oct. 8 to run the central bank. That will mark a safe, boring end to a wild nomination process. But a little certainty is what global investors need from a politically chaotic Washington. A debt ceiling deal remains elusive, but at least there’s some predictability on Fed policy.

Oct 8, 2013
via Breakingviews

GOP’s best bargaining tactic: raise debt ceiling

Photo

By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Congressional Republicans might want to consider a new bargaining tactic: raising the debt ceiling. Using the prospect of imminent default to force the White House to a compromise on the government shutdown isn’t working. Removing it from the table would show that the GOP can be reasonable – and allow the funding debate to rage without roiling global financial markets.

Sep 20, 2013
via Breakingviews

Fed politics may just preserve Fed’s independence

Photo

By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

America’s dysfunctional politics might just preserve the central bank’s independence – if inadvertently. President Barack Obama’s pick as the next chairman of the Federal Reserve, Larry Summers, was torpedoed by congressional opposition. That suggests an unwelcome increase of political meddling in the Fed’s affairs. But if the Fed’s internal choice, Janet Yellen, gets the job, isn’t the central bank’s sovereignty maintained? It’s a messy way to the right outcome.

Sep 19, 2013
via Breakingviews

Activist would contest Obama’s capital allocation

Photo

By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

If Barack Obama were the chief executive officer of the United States, an activist investor would have a field day contesting his allocation of capital – political capital, that is. In the CEO analogy, an uppity shareholder would want more focus on the economy, jobs and fiscal challenges.

Sep 16, 2013
via Breakingviews

Summers smart enough to avoid Fed chair battle

Photo

By Daniel Indiviglio

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Larry Summers is smart enough to have decided to avoid a battle over the chairmanship of the Federal Reserve. Despite the support of embattled U.S. President Barack Obama, the former Treasury chief faced opposition from both liberal Democrats and plenty of his dismal scientist peers. Summers says it’s better for the economic recovery not to have the fight. That may be true – unless his exit from the race opens new fissures.

    • About Daniel

      "Daniel Indiviglio is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist, based in Washington, where he covers the intersection of politics and business. He joined from The Atlantic, where he covered a similar beat, providing analysis on topics such as financial regulation, housing finance policy, the Treasury, and the Fed. He also wrote for Forbes. He is a 2011 Robert Novak Journalism Fellow through the Phillips Foundation. Prior to becoming a journalist, Dan spent several years working as an investment banker and a consultant for financial services firms. He holds a BA from Cornell University, where he triple majored in economics, philosophy and physics. ..."
    • Follow Daniel