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Mar 18, 2013
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Cure for U.S. housing malaise may sustain disease

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By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The cure for the U.S. housing malaise may sustain its disease. A new Senate bill seeks to forbid Congress from raising Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac’s mortgage guarantee fees to pay for federal spending. It sounds sensible. But in the alternate universe that is Washington, it may kill one of the few ways available to reduce taxpayer support for housing and bring back private capital.

Mar 12, 2013

Small U.S. banks have too-big-to-fail obsession

(The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions
expressed are his own.)

By Daniel Indiviglio

WASHINGTON, March 12 (Reuters Breakingviews) -
T oo-big-to-fail still looms large for America’s community banks,
despite the best efforts of lawmakers. At the Independent
Community Bankers of America annual gathering this week, the
little guys, who make up the bulk of American bank charters if
not assets, will argue that Dodd-Frank failed to do the trick. A
study citing an $83 billion subsidy and the U.S. attorney
general admitting some banks are too big to jail re-energized
their opposition. But the small fries would be better off
focusing on their businesses.

Mar 8, 2013
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Financiers failing own version of Hippocratic Oath

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By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Financiers are failing their version of the Hippocratic Oath. They aren’t taking the necessary measures to keep client money safe, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission warns. The failure is as basic as doctors not washing their hands, despite reminders from the likes of Refco and MF Global. The extent and severity of the problem should worry customers and investors alike.

Mar 1, 2013
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Review: Conscious companies can revive capitalism

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By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Free markets often get the blame for such troubling outcomes as inequality, corporate scandals and economic crises. In “Conscious Capitalism,” Whole Foods co-founder and co-CEO John Mackey and business professor Raj Sisodia argue that economic liberty needs a reboot.

Feb 28, 2013
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U.S. budget cuts more blip than bomb

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By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

For all the rhetoric from both political parties, the impending U.S. budget cuts are more a blip than a bomb. An initial $100 billion-worth of federal spending reductions won’t do much real damage to the growing economy.

Feb 26, 2013
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Negative intellectual equity traps mortgage reform

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By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Mortgage reform is caught in a negative intellectual equity trap. On Monday the Bipartisan Policy Center, a Washington think tank, unveiled its plan to shake up housing finance. Unfortunately, it rests on the usual received wisdom that the market cannot exist without a government backstop. It’s an idea prevalent among lawmakers, bankers and investors. It’s wrongheaded.

Feb 22, 2013

U.S. housing quagmire embodied in JPMorgan deal

(The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions
expressed are his own.)

By Daniel Indiviglio

WASHINGTON, Feb 22 (Reuters Breakingviews) – JPMorgan’s
(JPM.N: Quote, Profile, Research) coming mortgage deal embodies the U.S. housing finance
quagmire. The bank is looking to sell its first home-loan bond
without government backing since the financial crisis. That
hints at a belief in this part of the securitization market
among both lenders and investors. But until housing finance
rules are clarified and Fannie Mae (FNMA.OB: Quote, Profile, Research) and Freddie Mac’s
(FMCC.OB: Quote, Profile, Research) funding advantage is withdrawn, these deals will
remain rare.

Feb 20, 2013
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U.S. deficit dynamic duo remain uncontested champs

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By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Alan Simpson and Erskine Bowles remain the uncontested champions in crafting compromise in Washington. The original bipartisan plan to rein in America’s fiscal deficit which the dynamic duo spearheaded in 2010 became part of the vernacular – though was rejected by policymakers. Now they have come up with a revised $2.4 trillion compromise. Like the original, it contains plenty of items not to love. Yet balanced alternatives to restrain the national debt remain elusive.

Feb 15, 2013
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New U.S. TBTF plan is too big to succeed

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By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

A U.S. lawmaker’s new idea to fix too-big-to-fail looks too big to succeed. In theory, Republican Representative John Campbell’s proposal for a new capital cushion at the largest banks could minimize the likelihood of bailouts and justify the lighter regulation he desires. But do the math, and the proposal would mean big U.S. banks issuing more than $2 trillion of junior debt. Other flaws aside, that just doesn’t square with today’s markets.

Feb 8, 2013
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Slowing U.S. snail mail could speed innovation

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By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Slowing U.S. snail mail could speed up innovation. The Postal Service is halting Saturday deliveries to save money. That won’t cover its $5 billion annual losses or plug its pension hole. Even so, it’s an opportunity for Uncle Sam to hasten corporate and individual technology adoption. Over time, further shrinking the USPS should have broader economic benefits.

    • About Daniel

      "Daniel Indiviglio is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist, based in Washington, where he covers the intersection of politics and business. He joined from The Atlantic, where he covered a similar beat, providing analysis on topics such as financial regulation, housing finance policy, the Treasury, and the Fed. He also wrote for Forbes. He is a 2011 Robert Novak Journalism Fellow through the Phillips Foundation. Prior to becoming a journalist, Dan spent several years working as an investment banker and a consultant for financial services firms. He holds a BA from Cornell University, where he triple majored in economics, philosophy and physics. ..."
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