Facebook leaves niche competitors behind

By Ben Walsh
July 23, 2014

These are good times for Facebook. The social media site reported second quarter earnings of $0.42 per share and revenue of $2.91 billion on Wednesday afternoon. Analysts polled by Thomson Reuters expected $0.32 in earnings per share and revenue of $2.8 billion. The company’s stock is up just under 1% in after hours trading. Reuters’ Stephen Culp charts Facebook’s share price relative to the S&P 500 and five of its competitors. The comparison is striking and decidedly in Facebook’s favor.

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It was only back in April that tech stocks, Facebook included, were falling and people were scrambling to explain why.  In the intervening months, Facebook has not been alone in reversing that decline. While its more niche competitors like those charted above have performed poorly on an absolute and relative basis, year-to-date, a host of bigger tech companies’ stocks beaten the S&P 500′s 7.3% return: Google (up 8.9%); Apple (up 20.2%); Microsoft (up 20.8%). The NASDAQ itself is up 22.7%.

Perhaps the reason why Facebook’s stock performance varies so dramatically from the Zyngas and Yelps of the world is because those companies aren’t Facebook’s real competition.  It’s being treated by the market like a tech and advertising behemoth it is, not the single desktop product company it was, with performance in line multi-hundred billion dollar market cap companies. The idea that Mark Zuckerberg is building a “holding company for various properties in world domination,” as Joseph Cotterill put it, is close to the consensus view. Or, a slightly less ominous conclusion is that the market really does believe that Facebook is becoming a P&G-style brand holding company that sucks ad dollars from phones around the world.

 

 

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Morons. Morons everywhere.

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