Numbers of interest

October 24, 2014

Welcome to our inaugural weekend Data Dive–a shortlist of charts from around the web culled from the week that went.

Who’s afraid of the big, bad.. um?

It’s not only about wolves and ogres anymore. Just like barbecue recipes and fashion, regional and cultural biases affect attitudes of all sorts, including existential malaise. Quartz’s cartographer of the apocalypse unpacks Pew data about what worries whom the most to give us the world’s greatest fears, mapped by country.(Hint: Africans care more about viruses; Europeans about nukes.)

 That airbag scare? It’s not over yet. 

The number of vehicles affected by the massive Takata airbag recall are changing so quickly—now over 12 million worldwide—you should just use the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s VIN look-up tool to make sure you’re safe.

You say news, I say conspiracy

Fortunes have been made and comedy careers launched under the maxim that “liberals and conservatives inhabit different worlds.” New Pew polling on political polarization and media habits quantifies just how disparate views on the news can be.

It’s game odds on

It’s been 29 years since Kansas City played in—and won!—a World Series. With the Fall Classic center stage this weekend, ESPN celebrates 29 reasons to root for this Royals team.

Apple earnings: Even better than we thought

Analysts cast iPad sales as the lone weakness in Apple’s earnings, but the company’s just-released line of tablets are poised to help provide a blockbuster holiday season. MarketWatch gives us five amazing numbers from Apple’s earnings release and Reuters compares tablet sales.

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