Comments on: The problem with grandparents http://blogs.reuters.com/data-dive/2014/12/08/the-problem-with-grandparents/ Mon, 23 Mar 2015 20:11:41 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: OneOfTheSheep http://blogs.reuters.com/data-dive/2014/12/08/the-problem-with-grandparents/comment-page-1/#comment-442 Fri, 12 Dec 2014 19:14:32 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/data-dive/?p=2211#comment-442 C- opinion, Mr. Corones

For most of history and before might meant right.

If you had strength of a sort, be it physical, mental or economic your “lot in life” was generally better than that of others. In such societies, those “on top” didn’t have to be polite, compassionate, merciful or display any of the recognized traits of “civilization.

Samuel Colt made the multitudes of those NOT strong “equal”. Majority preference has led to the mirage of an egalitarian democracy in the twentieth century. It has rather naturally followed that those who accumulate useful knowledge generally have skills and experience of increasing advantage as they age. That’s why the elders in most civilized societies control a majority of the wealth.

Today America as well as the rest the world has an exploding “underclass” who demand economic equality without having earned it. It is those with no money, no education, no skills, no property, no job and little chance of accumulating any of these things that are breeding at a rate that would embarrass rodents. By and large these individuals embrace democracy because they think they can vote themselves the “good life” over time.

Unfortunately, governments make nothing. That which they give they must first take from someone else. So it is probably inevitable that governments the world over will increasingly appropriate, by taxation or increasing costs of necessary health care, wealth amassed a little at a time over many, many years so it can be redistributed into the hands of the largest voting block. Can’t have all those “senior citizens” sitting on their own money or spending it on non-essentials like enjoying golf and cruises.

Perhaps the best that can be hoped for is a “Star Trek” economy where the basic needs of everyone breathing are met, and only those who want to work will do so, and then only such professions as they choose and only so long as they wish. We live in interesting times.

]]>
By: cynical175 http://blogs.reuters.com/data-dive/2014/12/08/the-problem-with-grandparents/comment-page-1/#comment-435 Wed, 10 Dec 2014 00:53:29 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/data-dive/?p=2211#comment-435 Somebody finally woke up that this?
On top of this for the working people the take home pay is less and now you suddenly find out that people are not spending enough money i.e. going deeper in debt. The banks are sitting all the money that the Federal Reserve printed for them and stays there.

Putting this in simple words you have (had)a consumers based economy, Money that should be flowing through the system but isn’t. People are or are going broke and now the seniors that brought you all this wonderful life by being careful with their money now no longer have the option to spend their declining savings due to the banks and stock market shenanigans.

Hello rockets scientist you finally woke up?

]]>
By: StevenPiper http://blogs.reuters.com/data-dive/2014/12/08/the-problem-with-grandparents/comment-page-1/#comment-434 Tue, 09 Dec 2014 23:13:21 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/data-dive/?p=2211#comment-434 Aside from being snarky and disrespectful, what exactly is your point? That Grandma should join the Hemlock Society?

]]>
By: AdamSmith http://blogs.reuters.com/data-dive/2014/12/08/the-problem-with-grandparents/comment-page-1/#comment-430 Tue, 09 Dec 2014 03:19:34 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/data-dive/?p=2211#comment-430 It repeats the fallacy that a younger population is good for society.

In fact history shows the opposite is true. One need only consider the nations with the youngest median age, for example Nigeria, Mexico and India. Then compare those societies with the nations having the oldest median age.

It’s very clear that nations with the youngest median age have the greatest poverty, crime and corruption: Think Nigeria, Mexico and India. The most advanced nations have the highest median ages: Think Switzerland, Norway, Finland, Japan, Germany, Britain.

Picture a hypothetical American husband and a wife running a household, with, let’s say three children. Assume they are in debt, working very hard, and struggling to make ends meet. Would having even more children remedy their financial situation? Of course not.

]]>
By: OneOfTheSheep http://blogs.reuters.com/data-dive/2014/12/08/the-problem-with-grandparents/comment-page-1/#comment-429 Tue, 09 Dec 2014 00:58:12 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/data-dive/?p=2211#comment-429 For most of history and before might meant right.

If you had strength of a sort, be it physical, mental or economic your “lot in life” was generally better than that of others. In such societies, those “on top” didn’t have to be polite, compassionate, merciful or display any of the recognized traits of “civilization.

Samuel Colt made the multitudes of those NOT strong “equal”. Majority preference has led to the mirage of an egalitarian democracy in the twentieth century. It has rather naturally followed that those who accumulate useful knowledge generally have skills and experience of increasing advantage as they age. That’s why the elders in most civilized societies control a majority of the wealth.

Today America as well as the rest the world has an exploding “underclass” who demand economic equality without having earned it. It is those with no money, no education, no skills, no property, no job and little chance of accumulating any of these things that are breeding at a rate that would embarrass rodents. By and large these individuals embrace democracy because they think they can vote themselves the “good life” over time.

Unfortunately, governments make nothing. That which they give they must first take from someone else. So it is probably inevitable that governments the world over will increasingly appropriate, by taxation or increasing costs of necessary health care, wealth amassed a little at a time over many, many years so it can be redistributed into the hands of the largest voting block. Can’t have all those “senior citizens” sitting on their own money or spending it on non-essentials like enjoying golf and cruises.

Perhaps the best that can be hoped for is a “Star Trek” economy where the basic needs of everyone breathing are met, and only those who want to work will do so, and then only such professions as they choose and only so long as they wish. We live in interesting times.

]]>
By: AdamSmith http://blogs.reuters.com/data-dive/2014/12/08/the-problem-with-grandparents/comment-page-1/#comment-428 Mon, 08 Dec 2014 22:42:44 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/data-dive/?p=2211#comment-428 This pro-immigration article is full of errors. It repeats the fallacy that a younger population is good for society.

History shows the opposite is true. One need only consider the nations with the youngest median age today, for example Nigeria, Mexico and India. Then compare those societies with the nations having the oldest median age. Here are the numbers:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cou ntries_by_median_age

It’s very clear that nations with the youngest median age have the greatest poverty, crime and corruption. Think Nigeria, Mexico and India. The most advanced nations have the highest median ages. Think Switzerland, Norway, Finland and Japan.

Picture an American husband and a wife running a household, with, let’s say, three children. Assume the family is in debt, working very hard, and struggling to make ends meet. Would having even more children remedy their financial situation? Of course not.

]]>