Climate Change Correspondent, Asia, Singapore
David's Feed
Oct 26, 2010

Fifth of vertebrates face extinction-study

NAGOYA, Japan (Reuters) – About a fifth of the world’s vertebrates are threatened with extinction, a major review has found, highlighting the plight of nature that is the focus of global environment talks underway in Japan.

The study by more than 170 scientists across the globe used data for 25,000 species from the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) Red List of threatened species and examined the status of the world’s mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles and fishes.

Oct 26, 2010

Forestry takes centre-stage at U.N. talks on nature

NAGOYA, Japan (Reuters) – Delegates at a global U.N. meeting to preserve natural resources were on Tuesday trying to agree on ways to deploy about $4 billion in cash to help developing nations save tropical forests.

The talks in the Japanese city of Nagoya are aimed at setting new 2020 targets to protect plant and animal species, a protocol to share genetic resources between countries and companies and more funding to protect nature, especially forests.

Oct 22, 2010

Invasive species, climate change “deadly duo” – report

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Climate change is set to drive the spread of invasive plant and animals species, threatening forests, fisheries and crops, in a double blow to nature and livelihoods, a World Bank-funded report said on Friday.

The study by Nairobi-based Global Invasive Species Programme says a warmer world, more extreme weather and higher levels of planet-warming carbon dioxide will give some species an edge, devasting ecosystems at sea and on land.

Oct 22, 2010

Invasive species and climate change a “deadly duo”: report

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Climate change is set to drive the spread of invasive plant and animals species, threatening forests, fisheries and crops, in a double blow to nature and livelihoods, a World Bank-funded report said on Friday.

The study by Nairobi-based Global Invasive Species Programme says a warmer world, more extreme weather and higher levels of planet-warming carbon dioxide will give some species an edge, devastating ecosystems at sea and on land.

Oct 15, 2010

Scientists use seals, gliders to unlock ocean secrets

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Scientists are outfitting elephant seals and self-propelled water gliders with monitoring equipment to unlock the oceans’ secrets and boost understanding of the impacts of climate change.

Oceans regulate the world’s climate by soaking up heat and shifting it around the globe. They also absorb huge amounts of planet-warming carbon dioxide, acting as a brake on the pace of climate change.

Oct 15, 2010

Saving nature, economies at stake in Japan U.N., talks

SINGAPORE/TOKYO (Reuters) – Envoys from around the world meet in Japan from Monday to try to combat the destruction of nature and to value properly the services of forests, coral reefs and oceans that underpin livelihoods and economic growth.

The United Nations says natural resources, or natural capital, are being lost at an alarming rate and urgent steps need to be taken to combat the destruction of plant and animal species that ensure mankind’s survival.

Oct 14, 2010

U.N. climate panel agrees to reforms

SINGAPORE/OSLO (Reuters) – The U.N. panel of climate scientists agreed on Thursday to change its practices in response to errors in a 2007 report, and its chairman, Rajendra Pachauri of India, dismissed suggestions he should step down.

At an October 11-14 meeting in Busan, South Korea, the 130-nation panel agreed to tighten fact-checking in reports that help guide the world’s climate and energy policies and to set up a “task force” to decide on wider reforms by mid-2011.

Oct 12, 2010

Wilmar says no major impact from moratorium

SINGAPORE/KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) – Wilmar International (WLIL.SI: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz), the world’s No.1 palm oil firm, expects Indonesia’s proposed two-year ban on clearing forests to have a limited impact on its operations as land available for oil palm estates is ample.

Singapore-listed Wilmar’s stand run counter to many palm oil and mining firms who fear the moratorium — part of a $1 billion deal with Norway aimed at fighting deforestation and carbon emissions — will curb expansion and future earnings.

Oct 12, 2010

“Invisible” nature key to global economy: U.N.

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Nature is not just about fluffy animals or brightly colored frogs — it’s central to the health of businesses that need to incorporate environmental impacts into their risk management, a senior United Nations official said.

Such an approach should be obvious, said Richard Burrett, co-chair of the United Nations Environment Programme’s Finance Initiative, yet nature remains essentially invisible to many people and companies, particularly in urban centers.

Oct 11, 2010

REDD forest offset demand 3-7 years away

JAKARTA/SINGAPORE (Reuters) – A global market in forest carbon offsets under a U.N.-backed scheme will take three to seven years to develop in part because of the stalled U.S. climate bill, a top Indonesian forest investor said.

The United Nations says the scheme, called reduced emissions from deforestation and degradation, or REDD, could be worth billions of dollars a year to developing nations, which would earn money from protecting and rehabilitating carbon-absorbing rainforests.

    • About David

      "I report on climate policy, climate science and the carbon market (CDM, emissions trading) in Asia. I'm based in Singapore. It's a great story in a fast-growing and fast-changing region. I've been writing about climate change since university in Canberra, where I did a life sciences degree, with a communications major on the side. I started writing science articles for newspapers and, soon after completing my studies, joined as a cadet on The Canberra Times. After a few years there, it was off to London and then Hong Kong."
      Joined Reuters:
      1994
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