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Dec 20, 2013

Reagan’s would-be assassin to get more time away from hospital

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – John Hinckley is ready for more freedom from the mental hospital where he has lived since shortly after he shot President Ronald Reagan in a failed assassination attempt in 1981, a federal judge ruled on Friday.

U.S. District Judge Paul Friedman accepted a recommendation from St. Elizabeths Hospital that Hinckley be allowed to leave for 17 days a month, up from 10 days a month, to stay with his mother in Williamsburg, Virginia.

Dec 20, 2013

U.S. diplomats, but not prosecutors, seek to quell Khobragade dispute

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. government sought to present a united front on Thursday and play down any signs of a rift between the State Department and law enforcement officials over how to handle the politically sensitive case of an Indian diplomat subjected to a strip search over alleged visa fraud.

The arrest has enraged India, which demanded that charges be dropped against the diplomat, Devyani Khobragade. New Delhi has also demanded the arrest of the housekeeper, also an Indian national, who had accused her of fraud and underpayment of wages.

Dec 20, 2013

U.S. diplomats, but not prosecutors, seek to quell India dispute

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. government sought to present a united front on Thursday and play down any signs of a rift between the State Department and law enforcement officials over how to handle the politically sensitive case of an Indian diplomat subjected to a strip search over alleged visa fraud.

The arrest has enraged India, which demanded that charges be dropped against the diplomat, Devyani Khobragade. New Delhi has also demanded the arrest of the housekeeper, also an Indian national, who had accused her of fraud and underpayment of wages.

Dec 18, 2013

U.S. surveillance case: Tech may clash with 18th Century right

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A judge’s bid this week to stop the U.S. government from collecting Americans’ phone records raises a question that the U.S. Supreme Court has confronted before: at what point should modern technology force judges to revisit legal precedents?

Technological advancements from the automobile to the Global Positioning System (GPS) have tested the justices over the years as they tried to figure out how to apply to modern circumstances an 18th Century guarantee in the U.S. Constitution against unreasonable searches.

Dec 18, 2013

Analysis – U.S. surveillance case: Tech may clash with 18th Century right

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A judge’s bid this week to stop the U.S. government from collecting Americans’ phone records raises a question that the U.S. Supreme Court has confronted before: at what point should modern technology force judges to revisit legal precedents?

Technological advancements from the automobile to the Global Positioning System (GPS) have tested the justices over the years as they tried to figure out how to apply to modern circumstances an 18th Century guarantee in the U.S. Constitution against unreasonable searches.

Dec 17, 2013

Insight: U.S. asks if car dealers ganged up on shopping website TrueCar

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – It used to be that people in the market for a new car could go to the car-shopping website TrueCar.com, which collects bids from auto dealerships, and get dealers to undercut one another on price. Dealers could see the rival prices, so prices tumbled lower over time almost like a reverse-auction.

Faced with complaints from dealers over the way that worked, TrueCar changed its website, the system became less competitive, with dealers no longer seeing rival prices, and now U.S. antitrust enforcers are trying to unravel what happened.

Dec 17, 2013

U.S. asks if car dealers ganged up on shopping website TrueCar

WASHINGTON, Dec 17 (Reuters) – It used to be that people in
the market for a new car could go to the car-shopping website
TrueCar.com, which collects bids from auto dealerships, and get
dealers to undercut one another on price. Dealers could see the
rival prices, so prices tumbled lower over time almost like a
reverse-auction.

Faced with complaints from dealers over the way that worked,
TrueCar changed its website, the system became less competitive,
with dealers no longer seeing rival prices, and now U.S.
antitrust enforcers are trying to unravel what happened.

Dec 17, 2013

U.S. judge says phone surveillance program likely unlawful

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. government’s gathering of Americans’ phone records is likely unlawful, a judge ruled on Monday, raising “serious doubts” about the value of the National Security Agency’s so-called metadata counter terrorism program.

“I cannot imagine a more ‘indiscriminate’ and ‘arbitrary invasion’ than this systematic and high-tech collection and retention of personal data on virtually every single citizen,” U.S. District Judge Richard Leon, appointed by Republican President George W. Bush in 2002, wrote in a 68-page ruling.

Dec 16, 2013

U.S. judge rules phone surveillance program is likely unlawful

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. government’s gathering of Americans’ phone records is likely unlawful, a judge ruled on Monday and ordered the suspension of the collection of data on two phone company customers who sued the Obama administration.

In a significant challenge to U.S. spying authority, U.S. District Judge Richard Leon in Washington D.C. wrote that the government’s program likely violated Americans’ right to be free of unreasonable searches.

Dec 6, 2013

LME wants aluminum warehousing suits heard in New York

LAS VEGAS, Dec 5 (Reuters) – The London Metal Exchange asked
a panel of U.S. judges on Thursday to assign a federal court in
Manhattan to handle a series of antitrust lawsuits that allege
the world’s largest metal exchange, two of Wall Street’s biggest
banks and big commodity merchants conspired to raise the price
of aluminum.

The venue of lawsuits is sometimes critically important
because of the varying levels of experience among judges in
different cities, as well as other factors such as convenience
for lawyers and witnesses.