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Sep 30, 2015

House introduces legislation to extend rail safety deadline

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. lawmakers, under mounting pressure from the railroad industry, announced bipartisan legislation on Wednesday to extend a Dec. 31 deadline for costly new safety technology for at least another three years.

The bill, introduced by Republicans and Democrats on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, could avert a threatened service suspension by major railroads that cannot meet the current deadline, which Congress imposed in 2008, for implementing positive train control, or PTC, technology.

Sep 29, 2015

Fiat Chrysler faces safety data issues months after record U.S. fine

WASHINGTON, Sept 29 (Reuters) – Two months after receiving a
record $105 million fine for lapses in U.S. auto safety recalls,
Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV faces new problems over
lax safety reports that could lead to additional financial
penalties for the Italian-U.S. automaker.

Federal regulators said on Tuesday they uncovered an
apparent discrepancy at Fiat Chrysler in Early Warning Report
data that automakers must provide to the National Highway
Traffic Safety Administration under federal law. A subsequent
in-house investigation by the company found that information
including auto-related death and injury claims had gone
under-reported.

Sep 29, 2015

Fiat Chrysler reveals problems with U.S. safety reporting

WASHINGTON, Sept 29 (Reuters) – Two months after receiving a
record $105 million fine for lapses in U.S. auto safety recalls,
Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV on Tuesday revealed
problems with safety data that could lead to additional
financial penalties for the Italian-U.S. automaker.

Fiat Chrysler said it was investigating discrepancies in
early warning reports that federal law requires automakers to
provide to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration,
the federal auto safety watchdog. The reports include data that
could identify safety defects and ultimately lead to product
recalls.

Sep 25, 2015

U.S. to toughen auto emission tests in wake of VW scandal

WASHINGTON, Sept 25 (Reuters) – U.S. environmental
regulators on Friday announced tighter and broader auto
emissions tests to detect “defeat” devices in all cars and light
trucks in the United States and Canada, including gasoline
engines, after Volkswagen admitted it cheated on
diesel emissions.

The Environmental Protection Agency notified auto
manufacturers in a letter saying authorities could require
additional tests for “any vehicle” to determine whether it meets
emission standards under normal road conditions, not just at
controlled testing facilities.

Sep 23, 2015

(OFFICIAL)-INTERVIEW-West Virginia engineer proves to be a David to VW’s Goliath

, Sept 22 (Reuters) – Daniel Carder, an
unassuming 45-year-old engineer with gray hair and blue jeans,
appears an unlikely type to take down one of the world’s most
powerful companies.

But he and his small research team at West Virginia
University may have done exactly that, with a $50,000 study
which produced early evidence that Volkswagen AG was
cheating on U.S. vehicle emissions tests, setting off a scandal
that threatens the German automaker’s leadership, reputation and
finances.

Sep 22, 2015

West Virginia engineer proves to be a David to VW’s Goliath

MORGANTOWN, West Virginia (Reuters) – Daniel Carder, an unassuming 45-year-old engineer with gray hair and blue jeans, appears an unlikely type to take down one of the world’s most powerful companies.

But he and his small research team at West Virginia University may have done exactly that, with a $50,000 study which produced early evidence that Volkswagen AG (VOWG_p.DE: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) was cheating on U.S. vehicle emissions tests, setting off a scandal that threatens the German automaker’s leadership, reputation and finances.

Sep 22, 2015

Interview: West Virginia engineer proves to be a David to VW’s Goliath

MORGANTOWN, West Virginia (Reuters) – Daniel Carder, an
unassuming 45-year-old engineer with gray hair and blue jeans,
appears an unlikely type to take down one of the world’s most
powerful companies.

But he and his small research team at West Virginia
University may have done exactly that, with a $50,000 study
which produced early evidence that Volkswagen AG was
cheating on U.S. vehicle emissions tests, setting off a scandal
that threatens the German automaker’s leadership, reputation and
finances.

Sep 17, 2015

U.S. lawmakers see need to extend rail safety deadline

WASHINGTON, Sept 17 (Reuters) – U.S. lawmakers on Thursday
warned that Congress must act well before year-end to extend a
Dec. 31 deadline for railroads to adopt new safety measures, to
avoid major disruptions to freight and passenger service, but
some said they are uncertain about how to act.

“We cannot wait until the last minute to act,” Senate
Commerce Committee Chairman John Thune said at a hearing.
Without congressional action, Thune said, railroads will
probably “begin to cycle traffic off their lines” four to six
weeks prior to Dec. 31, the congressionally mandated deadline
for implementing safety technology known as positive train
control, or PTC.

Sep 16, 2015

U.S. watchdog urges Congress to allow rail safety deadline extension

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A U.S. watchdog office urged Congress on Wednesday to empower regulators to extend a Dec. 31 deadline for freight and passenger railroads to adopt new safety technology that could prevent major derailments and other deadly crashes.

A new report from the nonpartisan Government Accountability Office found about two-thirds of railroads, including the largest freight carriers, will need another one to five years to implement the technology known as positive train control, or PTC. Safety experts say it would have prevented a May 12 Amtrak derailment that killed eight and injured more than 200 others.

Sep 11, 2015

Major car makers agree to make automatic braking standard in U.S

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A group of major automakers accounting for more than half of U.S. auto sales will make automatic emergency braking standard on new U.S. vehicles in one of the nation’s biggest auto safety announcements since the introduction of standard airbags in the late 1980s.

The car makers, which accounted for 57 percent of car and light truck sales in the United States last year, will work out an implementation plan in coming months with auto safety regulators and experts, the nonprofit Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) said in a statement on Friday.

    • About David

      "David Morgan has covered news from Wall Street and Fleet Street to the White House, the Pentagon and Congress, including politics, macroeconomics, military affairs, corporate finance, U.S. intelligence, national security and the international markets. He has also reported from Atlanta on the rise of American conservatism, civil rights, homegrown terrorism and the Olympics, and helped chronicle the Sept. 11 attacks and their aftermath from Philadelphia, New York and Washington."
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