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Jun 2, 2015

Owners may need to have Takata air bags repaired more than once

WASHINGTON/DETROIT (Reuters) – The top U.S. auto safety regulator said that replacement parts for potentially defective Takata Corp air bag inflators may not offer consumers a remedy that lasts the life of the car.

Many cars equipped with older Takata air bag systems could have to be fixed more than once, said Mark Rosekind, head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Jun 2, 2015

U.S. regulator says will enforce December 31 deadline for new train safety controls

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Railroad companies that fail to meet a Dec. 31 deadline for installing new safety equipment could face U.S. government penalties, federal regulators told Congress on Tuesday, in the wake of last month’s deadly Amtrak passenger train crash in Philadelphia.

The pledge of action, which could include daily civil penalties, showed Washington was exerting renewed pressure on train operators to adopt safety technology that could have prevented the May 12 derailment.

May 27, 2015

U.S. to review pilot mental health after Germanwings crash

NEW YORK/WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A panel of experts from government and industry will review how the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration monitors the mental health of commercial pilots and will make recommendations within six months, the agency said on Wednesday.

Formation of the Pilot Fitness Aviation Rulemaking Committee was announced two months after a Germanwings flight crashed in the French Alps. Allegations that a co-pilot deliberately crashed the plane have prompted regulatory scrutiny of pilot screening procedures.

May 24, 2015

After bruising safety crisis, US car watchdog shows its bite

WASHINGTON, May 24 (Reuters) – The U.S. auto safety
watchdog, long criticized as toothless and slow, is showing both
bark and bite under its new boss – a testimony to his
credentials as a safety expert and a hardening of the
administration’s policy after a wave of deadly defects.

Having taken the helm of the National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration in January, Mark Rosekind has wasted no time in
forcing reluctant companies into recalling millions of defective
vehicles. In doing so, he has shown greater willingness than
some of his predecessors to use the government’s full legal
powers over the industry, some for the first time.

May 20, 2015

Takata doubling U.S. recall for defective air bags to 34 million vehicles

WASHINGTON/DETROIT (Reuters) – Japanese air bag manufacturer Takata Corp (7312.T: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) is doubling a recall of potentially deadly air bags to nearly 34 million vehicles, creating the largest automotive recall in American history, U.S. safety regulators said on Tuesday.

The recall involves passenger and driver-side air bag inflators in vehicles made by 11 automakers, the U.S. Department of Transportation, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and Takata said. It expands on the 16.6 million vehicles called back for repairs for the same issue in previous regional and national recalls, and boosts the number of vehicles affected globally since 2008 to more than 53 million.

May 19, 2015

Takata to recall 34 mln vehicles in U.S. with defective air bags

WASHINGTON/DETROIT (Reuters) – Japanese air bag manufacturer
Takata Corp has agreed to declare nearly 34 million
vehicles defective due to problems with air bag inflators,
creating the largest automotive recall in American history, U.S.
safety regulators said on Tuesday.

The recall, which still does not identify the reason why the
problem is occurring, involves passenger and driver-side air
bags in vehicles made by 11 automakers, the U.S. Department of
Transportation and the National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration said. It expands on previous regional and
national recalls for the same issue.

May 19, 2015

Takata recalling about 34 mln vehicles in U.S. with defective air bags

WASHINGTON, May 19 (Reuters) – Japanese air bag manufacturer
Takata Corp has agreed to declare nearly 34 million
vehicles defective due to problems with air bag inflators,
creating the largest automotive recall in American history, U.S.
safety regulators said on Tuesday.

The recall, which still does not identify the reason why the
problem is occurring, involves passenger and driver-side air
bags in vehicles made by 11 automakers, the U.S. Department of
Transportation and the National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration said. It expands on previous regional and
national recalls for the same issue.

May 19, 2015

Takata declares air bags in nearly 34 million vehicles defective: U.S.

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Japanese air bag manufacturer Takata Corp has agreed to declare nearly 34 million vehicles defective due to problems with air bag inflators, creating the largest automotive recall in American history, U.S. safety regulators said on Tuesday.

The recall, which still does not identify the reason why the problem is occurring, involves passenger and driver-side air bags in vehicles made by 11 automakers, the U.S. Department of Transportation and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said. It expands on previous regional and national recalls for the same issue.

May 19, 2015

Amtrak seeks fast U.S. approval for automated braking feature -document

WASHINGTON, May 18 (Reuters) – Amtrak is seeking expedited
approval to equip the Philadelphia site of last week’s
high-speed derailment with an automated braking system that
could have prevented the fatal mishap, according to a federal
regulatory document reviewed by Reuters.

The passenger rail operator told the Federal Communications
Commission (FCC) last Thursday that it would ask for special
temporary authority to use a radio frequency needed to operate a
speed-control system known as positive train control, or PTC, in
“the accident area,” an FCC document shows.

May 18, 2015

U.S. regulators turn up heat on Fiat Chrysler recalls

By David Morgan and Paul Lienert

(Reuters) – The Obama administration on Monday escalated a running regulatory battle with Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV, saying it could impose “multiple penalties” on the automaker and order a public hearing to examine FCA’s handling of 20 recalls affecting more than 10 million vehicles.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said Fiat Chrysler (FCHA.MI: Quote, Profile, Research) (FCAU.N: Quote, Profile, Research) could face up to $700 million (447 million pounds) in fines and be required to buy back or replace vehicles if regulators find evidence that it failed in its legal recall obligations.

    • About David

      "David Morgan has covered news from Wall Street and Fleet Street to the White House, the Pentagon and Congress, including politics, macroeconomics, military affairs, corporate finance, U.S. intelligence, national security and the international markets. He has also reported from Atlanta on the rise of American conservatism, civil rights, homegrown terrorism and the Olympics, and helped chronicle the Sept. 11 attacks and their aftermath from Philadelphia, New York and Washington."
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