David Rohde

The Arab world’s Silicon Valley?

By David Rohde
March 30, 2012

Update: At Leila Charfi’s request, I added a paragraph below and shortened her quote to give it more context. She was concerned that the original version highlighted the role of the Internet in Tunisia’s revolution but did not credit street protesters. At least 219 protesters died during the uprising, according to the UN.

The anti–Walmart

By David Rohde
March 22, 2012

ROCHESTER, N.Y. – Cashiers are barred from interacting with customers until they have completed 40 hours of training. Hundreds of staffers are sent on trips around the U.S. and world to become experts in their products. The company has no mandatory retirement age and has never laid off workers. All profits are reinvested in the company or shared with employees.

The way out of the Afghan abyss

By David Rohde
March 16, 2012

To a growing number of Americans, Afghanistan is a festering pit where the United States has no vital interests. To a growing number of Afghans, the United States is a self-absorbed and feckless power that is playing games in their country.

Live chat: US-UK foreign policy and Afghanistan

March 14, 2012

Join journalists David Rohde from Reuters and Julian Borger with The Guardian for a live chat at 3:30 pm Eastern Time (7:30 pm GMT) on the topic of Afghanistan and the foreign policies of the United States and the United Kingdom.

Inside Islam’s culture war

By David Rohde
March 8, 2012

ISTANBUL – In a state-of-the-art television studio here, the Islamic world’s version of America’s culture war is playing out in a lavishly re-created 16th century palace.

NPR Weekend Edition interview on drone strikes

By David Rohde
March 7, 2012

A March 3, 2012 interview with Scott Simon of NPR. To listen, click here.

How Obama’s drone war is backfiring

By David Rohde
March 1, 2012

This essay was originally published in the March/April issue of Foreign Policy.

When Barack Obama took the oath of office three years ago, no one associated the phrase “targeted killing” with his optimistic young presidency. In his inaugural address, the 47-year-old former constitutional law professor uttered the word “terror” only once. Instead, he promised to use technology to “harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories.”