Comments on: The Arab world’s Silicon Valley? http://blogs.reuters.com/david-rohde/2012/03/30/the-arab-worlds-silicon-valley/ Fri, 31 Jul 2015 03:37:49 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: hallofids http://blogs.reuters.com/david-rohde/2012/03/30/the-arab-worlds-silicon-valley/#comment-845 Mon, 02 Apr 2012 07:38:36 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/david-rohde/?p=707#comment-845 As I understand from the article, revolution has given a strong momentum for Tunisia. Of course, it is wrong to expect a miraculous of economic development right after revolution.. However, economic activity in all Mid-Eastern revolutionist countries are recovering appreciably..

Important thing is to make a country for all by ensuring rule of law on equality bases, which I believe was the purpose of revolutions in the Mid-East. Only after some conditions are met, country resources will be activated fully and that will lead to prosperity.

]]>
By: EllieK http://blogs.reuters.com/david-rohde/2012/03/30/the-arab-worlds-silicon-valley/#comment-842 Fri, 30 Mar 2012 18:46:29 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/david-rohde/?p=707#comment-842 I am a strong supporter of the State of Israel, but I do agree with @Iori Yagami’s comment, about the opening paragraph being gratuitously sensational. Crossed my mind as soon as I read it. In fact, Tunisia is quite a moderate, progressive, sophisticated country, or so say my in-laws who were born there, 60+ years ago, and are Jewish. They miss Tunis, tell me it was a more hospitable place for Jewish life than the area of France where they live now. That might be due to a variety of other issues though.

Okay, back to topic at hand. This is truly a shame, that Tunisia is not receiving more support and encouragement of the appropriate variety. Compare the situations in Egypt, Tunisia and Libya. Tunisia clearly has the most straightforward path to getting out from where it was held back by dictatorship. Yes, the people are educated, often tri-lingual, and very ready to embrace technology. But there is little or no oil money, other natural resources, unlike neighbors on all sides. It would seem to make the most sense to help this country through a transition, where the likelihood of success is high, and the people are receptive and eager. I am sad to read how a year later, the outlook for Tunisia is not as good as I had hoped.

In fact, I haven’t been able to find much coverage at all about Tunisia Thank you for writing this article, as Reuters is the only one who has done so.

]]>
By: Iori.Yagami http://blogs.reuters.com/david-rohde/2012/03/30/the-arab-worlds-silicon-valley/#comment-840 Fri, 30 Mar 2012 08:29:39 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/david-rohde/?p=707#comment-840 “A jihadist back from battling Americans in Afghanistan? A recruiter for al Qaeda’s North African affiliate? A Hamas member looking for volunteers to attack Israel?”

I don’t know why all your problem is Israel? Have you ever heard about Hammam Chut slaughter, when Israel attacked Tunisian land just to assassin some Fattah leaders here. So, Tunisians have the right to protect itself from the Israelian threat in the region, the only country in the Middle East that own nuclear weapons…

And I know, it’s not the subject here, but don’t be provocative please.

]]>