David Rohde

In Bosnia, are outsiders the answer, or the problem?

February 15, 2014

 

11,541 red chairs line Titova street in Sarajevo as the city marks the 20th anniversary of the start of the Bosnian war, on April 6, 2012. The country remains deeply divided, power shared between Serbs, Croats and Muslims in a single state ruled by ethnic quotas and united by the weakest of central governments. Reuters/Dado Ruvic

Analysis: Is Syria now a direct threat to the U.S.?

February 7, 2014

  Rebel fighters stand on a tank belonging to the Islamic Front near Nairab military airport, which is controlled by forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad, in Aleppo February 7, 2014. REUTERS/Hosam Katan

Rebel fighters stand on a tank belonging to the Islamic Front near Nairab military airport, which is controlled by forces loyal to Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad, in Aleppo February 7, 2014. REUTERS/Hosam Katan

Signing off

January 29, 2014

For the past two and a half years, I’ve had the privilege of writing a weekly opinion column for Reuters. Some of those columns made me proud. Others I wish I could do over.

Dooming the Syria talks before they begin

January 22, 2014

The United States won a short-term diplomatic victory over Iran this week. Under intense pressure from American officials, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon withdrew an invitation for Iranian officials to attend the Syria peace conference.

Newest victim of congressional wrecking ball: Iran policy

January 15, 2014

By design or accident, it is increasingly clear that the centerpiece of President Barack Obama’s second-term foreign policy is a nuclear agreement with Iran. Whether Obama can succeed, however, now depends on Congress staying out of the negotiations.

Gates, Obama and denying reality in the Middle East

January 8, 2014

The talk about former Defense Secretary Bob Gates’ blistering new memoir “Duty” has focused on the description of President Barack Obama’s tense 2011 Situation Room meeting with his top military advisers. A frustrated Obama expresses doubts about General David Petraeus, then U.S. commander in Afghanistan, and questions whether the administration can do business with Afghan President Hamid Karzai.

How 2013’s partisanship hurt us abroad, as well as at home

January 2, 2014

The furious partisan debate that erupted this week after a New York Times investigation questioned the central tenet of the Republican assault on the White House regarding Benghazi was a fitting end to 2013.

Will a billion ‘selfies’ cause us to miss history?

December 18, 2013

This week, Ron Haviv described to me the first time one of his photographs changed history.

Honor Mandela by stopping a genocide

December 11, 2013

As South Africans cheered President Barack Obama’s speech at the funeral of Nelson Mandela on Tuesday, a nation of 4.6 million people 2,500 miles north was being torn apart by religious hatred.

From Kiev to Kabul, the promise of prosperity

December 5, 2013

In Kiev, hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians have taken to the streets to demand the government join the European Union, in the hopes it will spur economic growth. In Kabul, Afghan leaders overwhelmingly voted to have American troops remain for another decade, in the hopes they will maintain a “war and aid economy” that has brought them unprecedented riches.