David Rohde

Why intervening in Mali was the right thing to do

By David Rohde
January 17, 2013

The question from a colleague – one whose work I admire – could have come from anyone in the United States.

Little America: An Afghan town, an American dream and the folly of for-profit war

By David Rohde
June 1, 2012

American officials inspect a field in Helmand, 1960s

Eight years ago, a 72-year-old American aid worker named Charles Grader told me a seemingly fantastical story. In a bleak stretch of Afghan desert that resembled the surface of Mars, several dozen families from states like Montana, Wisconsin and California had lived in suburban tract homes with backyard barbecues. For 30 years during the Cold War, the settlement served as the headquarters of a massive American project designed to wean Afghans from Soviet influence.

An American intervention gone partly right

By David Rohde
April 27, 2012

SARAJEVO – Seventeen years and $17 billion later, Bosnia is at peace today, but it is stillborn.

The way out of the Afghan abyss

By David Rohde
March 16, 2012

To a growing number of Americans, Afghanistan is a festering pit where the United States has no vital interests. To a growing number of Afghans, the United States is a self-absorbed and feckless power that is playing games in their country.

Talk to the Taliban

By David Rohde
January 12, 2012

WASHINGTON — As American officials scramble to contain the fallout from an appalling video showing Marines urinating on dead Taliban fighters, news that the Obama administration is carrying out secret negotiations with the Taliban has barely registered on the American political landscape. The lack of interest in the talks – and public outrage at the video – reflects how little Americans apparently care about the conflict, despite its staggering human and fiscal cost.

Looking to Afghanistan’s future

By David Rohde
October 7, 2011

As the 10th anniversary of the start of the Afghan war is marked around the world, looking forward is more important than looking back. As I noted in an earlier post, staggering mistakes have been made over the last decade. While individual Americans and Afghans have performed heroically, the Afghan and American governments – particularly their civilian arms – have performed anemically. And Pakistan’s intelligence service – the ISI – is the single largest impediment to stability in the region.

from The Great Debate:

Awlaki and the Arab autumn

By David Rohde
September 30, 2011

By David Rohde
The opinions expressed are his own.

The death of Anwar al-Awlaki this morning is welcome news, but Washington policymakers should not delude themselves into thinking the drone that killed him is a supernatural antidote to militancy. Yes, drone strikes should continue, but the real playing field continues to be the aftermath of the Arab spring; namely vital elections scheduled for October in Tunisia and November in Egypt.

from The Great Debate:

Creating a “light, long term footprint” in Afghanistan

By David Rohde
September 22, 2011

By David Rohde
The views expressed are his own.

This is a response to Rory Stewart's book excerpt, "My uphill battle against the Afghanistan intervention."

from The Great Debate:

The 9/11 generation

By David Rohde
September 8, 2011

By David Rohde
The opinions expressed are his own.

In a speech last week at the American Legion convention in Minneapolis, President Obama rightly hailed what he called “the 9/11 generation,” the five million Americans who served in the military over the last decade.