Davos Notebook

The problem with capitalism is democracy

By Gary Regenstreif
January 25, 2012

The rich and powerful at Davos debated capitalism today with a defense that invoked Winston Churchill’s famous dictum on democracy. “Democracy,” Churchill told the House of Commons, “is the worst form of government, except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.”

from Felix Salmon:

Against the optimists

By Felix Salmon
January 27, 2010

One of the more annoying aspects of the Davos echo-chamber is the way in which people are constantly asking each other what "the mood" is this year; the result is an inchoate consensus that since the crisis is over, markets are up, and countries are growing again, there must be grounds for optimism and the kind of yes-we-can thinking in which the World Economic Form has always specialized.

Five themes for Davos

January 22, 2010

Top (L-R): Steve Clarke, Natsuko Waki, Gerard Wynn, Martin Howell
Bottom (L-R): Peter Thal Larsen, Felix Salmon, Ben Hirschler, Krista Hughes

Of confidence and coconut trees

January 31, 2009

“Confidence grows at the rate that a coconut tree grows, but confidence falls at the rate that the coconut falls,” Montek Singh Ahluwalia, deputy chairman of India’s Planning Commission, told a panel in Davos.

Risk Takers Anonymous

January 31, 2009

An eminent scientist who studies the brain and economics thinks that the financial industry in essence became addicted and insensitive to both risk and reward.

Overheard in Davos

January 30, 2009

One of the best things about Davos is the conversations you overhear. It’s like no place else.

U.S. – They’re skint, they’re frugal, get used to it

January 29, 2009

Good session on the “Frugal American,” an as yet undiscovered species that is coming to a global economy near you.

It’s never too late to blame Greenspan

January 29, 2009

Alan Greenspan hasn’t been chairman of the Fed for three years, but his policy mistakes keep paying dividends in the form of blame at this year’s World Economic Forum in Davos.

from James Saft:

Whose job is it to stimulate Europe?

January 28, 2009

So do countries which can borrow money more cheaply, Germany for example, have a higher obligation to borrow, spend and make things better for everyone across Europe?