Environment Correspondent
Deborah's Feed
Sep 27, 2011

River basins could double food production: study

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Major river basins in Africa, Asia and Latin America could sustainably double food production in some of the poorest parts of the globe in the next few decades, water experts reported on Monday.

But myriad competing claims on the water — from industry, cities and power producers among others — may stand in the way of a big increase in food production.

Sep 26, 2011
via Environment Forum

A parka with windows, a big box in the sky

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Could you find domestic happiness living in an angular white parka with windows? A big box set on top of an apartment building? A turtle-shaped shell? A modular Y filled with triangles?

At the U.S. Energy Department’s Solar Decathlon, visitors can try on — OK, tour — these avant garde houses, knowing at least that they’re supremely energy efficient. And with the solar power industry on the defensive after the Solyndra bankruptcy, it’s a decent showcase for new technologies.

Sep 15, 2011

Arctic ice melts to second-lowest level: U.S. study

By Deborah Zabarenko, Environment Correspondent

(Reuters) – Sea ice on the Arctic Ocean shrank to its second-smallest extent since modern records began, in keeping with a long-term trend, the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center reported on Thursday.

The annual sea ice minimum was reached on September 9, the center said on its website here in a preliminary finding.

Sep 15, 2011

Space probe detects a planet with a double sunset

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – When the day ends on planet Kepler-16b there is a double sunset, scientists reported on Thursday in the journal Science.

In a scene reminiscent of science fiction, researchers using observations from NASA’s Kepler spacecraft have detected a distant planet orbiting two waltzing stars, the first time such a phenomenon has been confirmed.

Sep 14, 2011

Al Gore: climate science “reality” versus Republicans

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – For Al Gore, the choice is obvious: Either accept scientific reality about climate change or believe what the fossil fuel industry is paying some Republican candidates to say.

“Anti-climate lobbyists … give massive campaign contributions and they’re not shy about making it clear to the candidates they support that there’s a quid pro quo. In return for getting their money, these candidates have to pretend that they really believe this nonsense,” the longtime climate change campaigner said on Wednesday in a telephone interview.

Sep 14, 2011

New index points to climate adaptation investments

WASHINGTON, Sept 14 (Reuters) – Kyrgyzstan and some other
parts of the former Soviet Union could have investment
potential as they adapt to a warming world, according to a
ranking of 161 countries released on Wednesday.

The Global Adaptation Index, or GaIn, was put together by
international policy makers, economists and scientists to gauge
which countries need the most help but also which have the
greatest possibility of adapting to climate change.

Sep 12, 2011
via Environment Forum

Floods? Droughts? Wildfires? Hurricanes? Yes, there is a climate change connection

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For years, climate scientists were circumspect when asked if a specific bit of violent weather — for example, Hurricane Irene, the late-summer storm that slammed the heavily populated U.S. East Coast — could be blamed in some way on climate change.

“Climate is what you expect,” the scientists would say, “while weather is what you get.” They would often go on to say that while increasingly severe weather and correspondingly serious costs and consequences were forecast in climate change computer simulations, there was no way to directly blame a given storm on human-generated heat-trapping gases in Earth’s atmosphere.

Sep 9, 2011

Switch from coal to natural gas no boon to climate

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Relying more on natural gas than on coal would not significantly slow down the effects of climate change, even though direct carbon dioxide emissions would be less, a new study has found.

Burning coal emits far more climate-warming carbon dioxide than natural gas does, but it also releases lots of sulfates and other particles that block incoming sunlight and help cool the Earth, according to a study to be published in the peer-reviewed journal Climate Change Letters in October.

Sep 7, 2011

World environment programmes in U.S. budget crosshairs

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – What do flood prevention in Nepal, wildlife preservation in Namibia and reef fishing in Indonesia have to do with the U.S. budget?

Global conservation programs like these have all gotten help from the U.S. government, and they are probably prime targets of the budget-cutting congressional “super committee,” since they sit at the crossroads of two things Americans don’t like spending much money on: foreign aid and the environment.

Sep 7, 2011

World environment programs in budget crosshairs

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – What do flood prevention in Nepal, wildlife preservation in Namibia and reef fishing in Indonesia have to do with the U.S. budget?

Global conservation programs like these have all gotten help from the U.S. government, and they are probably prime targets of the budget-cutting congressional “super committee,” since they sit at the crossroads of two things Americans don’t like spending much money on: foreign aid and the environment.

    • About Deborah

      "I started with Reuters in 1986 in New York City, moving to Washington DC two years later. I've covered the Winter Olympics in Calgary and Salt Lake City, a couple wars, the State Department, White House, Pentagon, several long trials and a presidential sex scandal. Since 2006, I've been reporting on the environment and climate change."
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