Environment Correspondent
Deborah's Feed
Apr 25, 2011

Climate change to hit American West water supply

WASHINGTON, April 25 (Reuters) – Climate change could cut
water flow in some of the American West’s biggest river basins
– including the Rio Grande and the Colorado — by up to 20
percent this century, the Interior Department reported on
Monday.

This steep drop in stream flow is projected for parts of
the U.S. West that have seen marked increases in population and
droughts over recent decades, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar
said in a telephone briefing.

Apr 21, 2011

Ozone hole dominates shifting S.Hemisphere climate

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Climate policymakers and scientists need to look beyond global warming emissions of carbon dioxide and take the loss of stratospheric ozone into account, researchers said on Thursday.

The stratospheric ozone layer, which shields Earth from solar ultra-violet radiation, has thinned over the South Pole over the last half-century.

Apr 21, 2011

Ozone hole dominates shifting Southern Hemisphere climate

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Climate policymakers and scientists need to look beyond global warming emissions of carbon dioxide and take the loss of stratospheric ozone into account, researchers said on Thursday.

The stratospheric ozone layer, which shields Earth from solar ultra-violet radiation, has thinned over the South Pole over the last half-century.

Apr 19, 2011
via Environment Forum

Cows, climate change and the high court

Photo

If you took all the cows in the United States and figured out how much greenhouse gas they emit, would you be able to sue all the farmers who own them?

That interesting legal question came from Justice Antonin Scalia during Supreme Court oral arguments about whether an environmental case against five big U.S. power companies can go forward.

Apr 19, 2011

Top court questions global warming lawsuit

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Supreme Court on Tuesday questioned whether a global warming lawsuit against five big power companies can proceed, with several justices saying the Environmental Protection Agency, not federal judges, should deal with the issue.

The high court justices sounded a skeptical note during arguments when they asked whether complicated environmental issues, such as how much greenhouse gas pollution is allowable and how it should be curbed, should be left to federal judges.

Apr 19, 2011

US top court questions global warming lawsuit

WASHINGTON, April 19 (Reuters) – The Supreme Court on
Tuesday questioned whether a global warming lawsuit against
five big power companies can proceed, with several justices
saying the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, not federal
judges, should deal with the issue.

The high court justices sounded a skeptical note during
arguments when they asked whether complicated environmental
issues, such as how much greenhouse gas pollution is allowable
and how it should be curbed, should be left to federal judges.

Apr 17, 2011

Sugarcane grown for fuel cools Brazil’s climate

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Sugarcane grown to power Brazil’s cars and trucks as an alternative to climate-warming fossil fuels has a beneficial side effect: it also cools the local air temperature, scientists reported Sunday.

Researchers warned that this does not mean replacing Amazon forest or other natural vegetation with sugarcane fields. The benefit comes when sugarcane is introduced into existing agriculture, replacing pasture land or crops like soybeans.

Apr 15, 2011

U.S. 1872 mining law threatens Grand Canyon – report

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A U.S. law from the pick-and-shovel days of the Western frontier now threatens natural treasures including Grand Canyon National Park as mining claims on public lands proliferate, an environmental group said on Friday.

The 1872 Mining Law, signed by President Ulysses S. Grant, allows mining companies — including foreign-owned ones — to take about $1 billion a year in gold and other metals from public lands without paying a royalty, according to a report by the nonprofit Pew Environment Group.

Apr 15, 2011

1872 mining law threatens Grand Canyon

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A U.S. law from the pick-and-shovel days of the Western frontier now threatens natural treasures including Grand Canyon National Park as mining claims on public lands proliferate, an environmental group said on Friday.

The 1872 Mining Law, signed by President Ulysses S. Grant, allows mining companies — including foreign-owned ones — to take about $1 billion a year in gold and other metals from public lands without paying a royalty, according to a report by the nonprofit Pew Environment Group.

Apr 12, 2011
via Environment Forum

John Kerry has had it up to HERE with “The Flat Earth Caucus”

Photo

You remember John Kerry, right? Tall, silver-haired, urbane enough to be accused of being French. But there’s a feisty side to the senior senator from Massachusetts, and it was on display at a forum on energy and economic growth, where Kerry teed off on congressional Republicans and others who doubt the seriousness of the challenge of climate change.

“After a while you get exasperated and jaded and frustrated about it all,” Kerry told The New Republic forum at the National Press Club. “I’ve had it just about up to here with America’s indifference to the realities of this crisis … the United States is like an ostrich putting its head in the sand.”

    • About Deborah

      "I started with Reuters in 1986 in New York City, moving to Washington DC two years later. I've covered the Winter Olympics in Calgary and Salt Lake City, a couple wars, the State Department, White House, Pentagon, several long trials and a presidential sex scandal. Since 2006, I've been reporting on the environment and climate change."
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