Environment Correspondent
Deborah's Feed
Oct 7, 2013
via Environment Forum

Disasterology 3: Learning to shout after the Fukushima disaster

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For survivors of Superstorm Sandy in the U.S. Northeast, the Sendai tsunami in Japan and the massive earthquake in Chengdu, China, the scars of disaster are still palpable. I’m part of a group of journalists brought together by the East-West Center in Hawaii to see how the people and environments hit by these catastrophes are faring, one year,  two years and five years later. We began our tour on Sept. 29. Here are the other posts in the series:

On the afternoon of March 3, 2011, Japan’s public television network NHK was broadcasting a session of parliament live when warning chimes and a bulletin flashed across screens: “This is an earthquake early warning,” an announcer said. “Beware of a strong earthquake … The Tokyo studio is shaking right now.” When the picture switched to the studio, the announcer continued to speak in a calm voice. This was common practice, meant to avoid causing panic.

Oct 3, 2013
via Environment Forum

Disasterology 2: hard questions for Breezy Point homeowners a year after Sandy

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For survivors of Superstorm Sandy in the U.S. Northeast, the Sendai tsunami in Japan and the massive earthquake in Chengdu, China, the scars of disaster are still palpable. I’m part of a group of journalists brought together by the East-West Center in Hawaii to see how the people and environments hit by these catastrophes are faring, one year,  two years and five years later. We began our tour on Sept. 29. Here are the other posts in the series:

Breezy Point, Queens, New York:

Oct 3, 2013
via Environment Forum

Disasterology: Storm warnings that work — a lesson from Sandy

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For survivors of Superstorm Sandy in the U.S. Northeast, the Sendai tsunami in Japan and the massive earthquake in Chengdu, China, the scars of disaster are still palpable. I’m part of a group of journalists brought together by the East-West Center in Hawaii to see how the people and environments hit by these catastrophes are faring, one year,  two years and five years later. We began our tour on Sept. 29. Here are the other posts in the series:

Even big storm warnings must get personal if they’re going to do any good. Few people know that better than Jason Tuell, director of the Eastern Region of the U.S. National Weather Service, which includes nearly all of the swath that last year’s storm Sandy cut when it came ashore last October.

Sep 27, 2013

Factbox: What would happen if the U.S. government shuts down?

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A U.S. government shutdown is possible on October 1, the first day of fiscal 2014, because Congress has so far failed to find a way to pay for it.

A closure would have far-reaching consequences at federal agencies dealing with everything from sending out Social Security checks to collecting admission fees at national parks.

Sep 26, 2013

U.S. government workers brace for possible shutdown next week

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The White House and labor leaders discussed preparations for a possible U.S. government shutdown on October 1, a move that one union chief estimated could affect as many as 1 million workers, from housekeeping aides to rocket scientists.

The Obama administration’s offices of Management and Budget and Personnel Management told the union leaders in a conference call on Thursday that government employees would be informed in the next 24 to 36 hours whether they would be furloughed without pay in the event of a shutdown.

Sep 12, 2013

Leonardo da Vinci’s notebook on flight comes to Washington

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – More than five centuries after he scribbled in the pages of a well-worn pocket notebook, Leonardo da Vinci’s seminal document detailing how humans might emulate the flight of birds has landed at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.

Steps from the Wright Brothers’ 1903 Flyer in a shaded corner of the vast museum on Washington’s Mall, da Vinci’s “Codex on the Flight of Birds” goes on display on Friday for about six weeks.

Jul 25, 2013

Capitol Hill hearing focuses on Trayvon Martin shooting

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The racially charged shooting of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin was the focus of a congressional hearing on Wednesday, where Martin’s father vowed to find a way his son’s death could lead to positive changes for other black American men.

“We won’t let this verdict sum up who Trayvon was,” Tracy Martin told a packed hearing of the new Congressional Caucus on Black Men and Boys.

Jul 23, 2013

Washington’s corpse flower ends its stinky reign

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – For weeks, gawkers lined up at the U.S. Botanic Garden, hoping to be among the lucky ones to catch the show when a giant-sized corpse flower bloomed for the first time in seven years.

Its legendary stench was part of the attraction. On Sunday afternoon, when the 8-foot-tall (2.4-metre) Titan Arum plant finally began opening its petals, a smell almost strong enough to stop traffic lured tourists inside from the sweltering National Mall.

Jul 13, 2013

Unshattered record: pro baseball bats now break 50 percent less, USDA says

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Shattered baseball bats pose real danger when shards of wood go flying, but this happens half as often as it did just five years ago after the U.S. Forest Service joined Major League Baseball to figure out how to make bats more shatter-resistant.

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the finding on Friday, in a statement timed to dovetail with baseball’s All-Star Game on Tuesday.

Jul 3, 2013

Surplus U.S. catfish a tasty bipartisan item in Washington

WASHINGTON, July 3 (Reuters) – The U.S. Department of
Agriculture is spending $10 million on frozen catfish for poor
Americans this year as part of a Great Depression-era program
that hasn’t drawn a peep of protest from budget slashers in
Congress.

The program, which is buying 12 million catfish portions
along with vast amounts of other foods such as frozen
blueberries and chicken drumsticks, is the rare government
initiative that seems to have only friends in bitterly partisan
Washington.

    • About Deborah

      "I started with Reuters in 1986 in New York City, moving to Washington DC two years later. I've covered the Winter Olympics in Calgary and Salt Lake City, a couple wars, the State Department, White House, Pentagon, several long trials and a presidential sex scandal. Since 2006, I've been reporting on the environment and climate change."
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