Environment Correspondent
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May 15, 2010

Environmental group to sue U.S. over oil permits

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar improperly approved offshore oil operations in the Gulf of Mexico without regard to possible harm to marine mammals, an environmental group said Friday in a legal notice.

The Center for Biological Diversity said it plans to sue Salazar and the Interior Department’s Minerals Management Service (MMS) for failing to get environmental permits required by two environmental laws — the Marine Mammal Protection Act and the Endangered Species Act.

May 14, 2010

Environment group plans to sue US over oil permits

WASHINGTON, May 14 (Reuters) – U.S. Interior Secretary Ken
Salazar improperly approved offshore oil operations in the Gulf
of Mexico without regard to possible harm to marine mammals, an
environmental group said on Friday in a legal notice.

The Center for Biological Diversity said it plans to sue
Salazar and the Interior Department’s Minerals Management
Service (MMS) for failing to get environmental permits required
by two environmental laws — the Marine Mammal Protection Act
and the Endangered Species Act.

May 13, 2010

U.S. response to spill frustrates environmentalists

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. government response to the BP oil spill has frustrated environmental groups and Gulf Coast conservationists, who say they’re getting scant information about the disaster’s potential ecological effects.

“There’s a lot of concern now about the marine impact and we’re not getting a truly transparent response from NOAA (the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration),” Aaron Viles of the Gulf Restoration Network said on Thursday.

May 11, 2010
via Environment Forum

Gulf of Mexico oil spill prompts worries about Arctic drilling

Photo

With the spotlight shining on the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and on the executives sizzling in the hot seat on Capitol Hill, environmental advocates are looking north.

They’re worried that Shell Oil will start drilling in the Chukchi Sea off Alaska before the U.S. government reports on BP’s Deepwater Horizon drill rig disaster. And the environmental groups are not comforted by Interior Secretary Ken Salazar’s reassurances that no new drilling will take place until the government report is completed by May 28.

May 10, 2010
via Environment Forum

Washington math: oil spill + climate bill = new environmental polls

Photo

With BP’s spilled oil shimmering off the U.S. Gulf Coast, and a re-tooled bill to curb climate change expected to be unveiled this week in the U.S. Senate, what could be more appropriate than a bouquet of new environmental polls? Conducted on behalf of groups that want less fossil fuel use, the polls show hefty majorities favoring legislation to limit emissions of climate-warming carbon dioxide.

In the kind of harmonic convergence that sometimes happens inside the Capital Beltway, a new poll released on Monday by the Clean Energy Works campaign showed “overwhelming public support for comprehensive clean energy legislation,” with 61 percent of 2010 voters saying they want to limit pollution, invest in clean energy and make energy companies pay for emitting the carbon that contributes to climate change. A healthy majority — 54 percent — of respondents said they’d be more likely to re-elect a senator who votes for the bill.

May 8, 2010

Factbox: Oil spill adds to environment insults on US Gulf Coast

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The BP oil spill is the latest in a series of environmental insults to the U.S. Gulf Coast, from wetlands eradication to flood control measures that have starved marshes of new sediment deposits.

WETLANDS CLEARING: Early European settlers cleared coastal swamps and marshes in the Mississippi River delta to control malaria they believed was caused by the fetid air in wetlands. This destroyed coastal wetlands that filter pollution, shelter native species and act as buffers to slow down hurricanes that spawn in the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

May 7, 2010

Oil spill adds to environment insults on US Gulf Coast

WASHINGTON, May 7 (Reuters) – The BP <BP.L> oil spill is
the latest in a series of environmental insults to the U.S.
Gulf Coast, from wetlands eradication to flood control measures
that have starved marshes of new sediment deposits.

WETLANDS CLEARING: Early European settlers cleared coastal
swamps and marshes in the Mississippi River delta to control
malaria they believed was caused by the fetid air in wetlands.
This destroyed coastal wetlands that filter pollution, shelter
native species and act as buffers to slow down hurricanes that
spawn in the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

May 6, 2010

Scientists decry “assaults” on climate research

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – More than 250 U.S. scientists on Thursday defended climate change research against “political assaults” and warned that any delay in tackling global warming heightens the risk of a planet-wide catastrophe.

The scientists, all members of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, targeted critics who have urged postponing any action against climate change because of alleged problems with research shown in a series of hacked e-mails that are collectively known as “climate-gate.”

May 4, 2010

Oil cleanup chemicals worry environment watchdogs

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Oil-dispersing chemicals used to clean up the vast BP spill in the Gulf of Mexico carry their own environmental risks, making a toxic soup that could endanger marine creatures even as it keeps the slick from reaching the vulnerable coast, wildlife watchdogs say.

The use of dispersants could be a trade-off between potential short-term harm to offshore wildlife and possible long-term damage to coastal wildlife habitat if the oil slick were to reach land.

Apr 23, 2010

Commercial whaling may continue for 10 years: IWC

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Japan, Norway and Iceland could continue commercial whaling for another decade, despite a global ban, under a proposal released on Thursday by the International Whaling Commission.

Between 4,000 and 18,000 whales could be saved over the next 10 years under the compromise proposal, which sets lower catch limits for all three whaling nations than the self-imposed quotas they have now.

    • About Deborah

      "I started with Reuters in 1986 in New York City, moving to Washington DC two years later. I've covered the Winter Olympics in Calgary and Salt Lake City, a couple wars, the State Department, White House, Pentagon, several long trials and a presidential sex scandal. Since 2006, I've been reporting on the environment and climate change."
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