Comments on: The euro crisis as family drama http://blogs.reuters.com/edward-hadas/2012/06/13/the-euro-crisis-as-family-drama/ Wed, 07 Oct 2015 17:23:32 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: Shervani http://blogs.reuters.com/edward-hadas/2012/06/13/the-euro-crisis-as-family-drama/comment-page-1/#comment-629 Fri, 15 Jun 2012 12:35:26 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/edward-hadas/?p=253#comment-629 Pl. let Mr. Edward Hadas know that EU- ECO is a beckoning GOAL, it can not be a Safe Harbour; as freedom is an unremitting endeavour; Never a Final a chievement !
MJK Shervani

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By: GMavros http://blogs.reuters.com/edward-hadas/2012/06/13/the-euro-crisis-as-family-drama/comment-page-1/#comment-627 Thu, 14 Jun 2012 04:22:36 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/edward-hadas/?p=253#comment-627 Mr. Edward Hadas & Reuters should never attempt to write fiction novels such as this garbage here. Better yet, this exposes Reuters’s membership in the ‘Elite Club’.
All this nonsense here is just a poor cover-up attempt of the facts. Global criminal financial institutions & equally criminal politicians are behind this grand Ponzi Scheme,
which has already been uncovered & reported by all legitimate news media. Some of the major players include Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan, Citi Group, Deutsche Bank Group with their Corrupt Politician Accomplices. The victims of course are the unsuspecting tax paying working citizens.

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By: scythe http://blogs.reuters.com/edward-hadas/2012/06/13/the-euro-crisis-as-family-drama/comment-page-1/#comment-625 Wed, 13 Jun 2012 18:23:37 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/edward-hadas/?p=253#comment-625 the article employs a weak familial metaphor to avoid a succinct, penetrating analysis

not an easy task and best avoided

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By: Jim1648 http://blogs.reuters.com/edward-hadas/2012/06/13/the-euro-crisis-as-family-drama/comment-page-1/#comment-624 Wed, 13 Jun 2012 16:50:24 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/edward-hadas/?p=253#comment-624 I think you mean a GNP measured in trillions, not billions. But in any case, it would all be fairly simple if in fact the central bank “has the ability to create enough money to keep governments and the financial system afloat for as long as necessary”. It is just the opposite. They can keep them afloat past the current crisis if necessary, but what next? Germany has the longer term view, since they are paying the bills, and the others have the shorter term view, since they are spending it.

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