Edward Hadas

Reducing inequality – where to start?

By Edward Hadas
January 19, 2015

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The oil price is just plain wrong

By Edward Hadas
January 5, 2015

The price sign outside Costco in Westminster, Colorado, shows gas selling for $1.81.9 for the first time in years

The oil price is still too high, often too low and much too volatile. In other words, this is a market that doesn’t work well for anyone.

Surge pricing and the just economy

By Edward Hadas
October 15, 2014

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Call that money-printing?

By Edward Hadas
October 8, 2014

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The economic lessons from Scotland

By Edward Hadas
September 17, 2014

Adam Smith, one of the leading figures of the 18th century Scottish intellectual enlightenment, liked free markets and restrained governments. The 21st century campaigns for and against a Scottish political liberation show that governments have acquired an economic importance which Smith could hardly have imagined.

A holistic economics of healthcare

By Edward Hadas
September 10, 2014

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Time to retire unemployment

By Edward Hadas
August 20, 2014

Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Do autocrats and strong economies go hand in hand?

By Edward Hadas
August 15, 2014

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By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The stupidity of student debt

By Edward Hadas
July 2, 2014

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Three Ms for economics re-education

By Edward Hadas
May 21, 2014

Many economics students are unhappy with what they are being taught. A network of 62 groups from around the world has drawn up a petition calling for more “pluralism” in instruction. The malcontents find the dominant neoclassical model too narrow and want to know why so few experts predicted the 2008 financial crisis. They also want less abstract theory and more study of actual economies. The reproaches are just, but the students’ reform agenda is insufficiently radical.