Edward Hadas

The redundant fictions of Greek debt

By Edward Hadas
February 4, 2015

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Markets can prosper with new left

By Edward Hadas
January 27, 2015

Outsider parties are disrupting the political system in many developed economies. Greece is leading the way, with Syriza’s victory in the Jan. 25 election on a platform of radical economic change. Spain, where the new Podemos party leads the polls, could follow later this year. Fringe movements are also gaining traction in France, Italy and the UK. Something similar is happening even in the United States, where the Tea Party movement is shaking things up from within one of the established parties.

Finance more worrying than politics

By Edward Hadas
January 22, 2015

Which is the bigger threat to the world’s peace and prosperity – geopolitical conflict or financial disarray? In a more violent world, it is easy to forget the significant danger posed by finance.

Dubai the global microcosm

By Edward Hadas
December 19, 2014

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The economic lessons from Scotland

By Edward Hadas
September 17, 2014

Adam Smith, one of the leading figures of the 18th century Scottish intellectual enlightenment, liked free markets and restrained governments. The 21st century campaigns for and against a Scottish political liberation show that governments have acquired an economic importance which Smith could hardly have imagined.

Russia-Ukraine conflict shows money isn’t the root of all war

By Edward Hadas
September 3, 2014

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Many people think politics is really a branch of economics. When the United States invaded Iraq in 1991, the common cry was that it was all about oil. On the same thinking, rich countries were indifferent to the brutal civil war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo – which has cost 5.4 million lives, according to the International Rescue Committee – because the economic stakes were too low to matter. This economic reductionism goes on in developed countries too. Pundits and pollsters argue that elections are won and lost above all else on the economy.

Do autocrats and strong economies go hand in hand?

By Edward Hadas
August 15, 2014

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By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

A corporate abdication of corruption

By Edward Hadas
June 4, 2014

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Russia and the unreliable West

By Edward Hadas
March 12, 2014

The revival of East-West tension over Ukraine looks thoroughly geopolitical. But the context is bad economics. In the last century, Russia was damaged by flawed ideologies which originated in the West. And today it is damaged by Western economic policy.

The then and now of pensions

By Edward Hadas
January 16, 2013

What is the right size for pensions? That question can be approached in two ways: “then” and “now”. Pensions, and other economic arrangements to support elderly people, may be considered repayments for what they did back then, when they were young. Alternatively, these payments may be considered as a share of output right now. In rich countries, the two approaches are in conflict. The “then” logic, which is based on promises made long ago, supports higher pension payments than the “now” logic, which is mindful of rapidly ageing populations. Politicians struggle to find acceptable compromises between the two approaches.