Lifestyle/Entertainment Editor, Asia, Tokyo
Elaine's Feed
Nov 24, 2011

Japan looks to future with earnest crown prince

TOKYO (Reuters) – Over the past few weeks, Japanese Crown Prince Naruhito has been in the public eye as rarely before, whether tipping a wine glass in toasts at a state banquet or conferring imperial decorations as he stands in for Emperor Akihito, who has been in hospital.

Naruhito’s prominence while his 77-year-old father recovers from what court officials say is a mild case of pneumonia has given Japan a fresh look at the scholarly, unassuming man who likes animals and watching sumo wrestling with his 9-year-old daughter, Aiko.

Nov 17, 2011

Book Talk: Gish Jen on identity, belonging and home

TOKYO (Reuters) – Into a traditional northern New England town under pressure from chain stores and cell phone towers, its old family farms struggling, comes Hattie Kong, half-Chinese and newly widowed.

Soon she is joined by the teenaged daughter of a Cambodian immigrant family on the run from their past, as well as a former love from her youth — all, in their own ways, seeking new lives in the novel “World and Town,” by Gish Jen.

Nov 11, 2011

Doctor turned serial killer in World War II Paris

TOKYO (Reuters) – Nazi-occupied Paris was a terrible place to be in the waning days of World War II, with Jews, Resistance fighters and ordinary citizens all hoping to escape. Disappearances became so common they often weren’t followed up.

And one man used the lawlessness for his own terrible purposes, killing perhaps as many as 150 people.

Nov 10, 2011

If Jane Austen lived today, she’d be a blogger

TOKYO, Nov 10 (Reuters) – Dear reader, if Jane Austen
lived today, she’d be an avid blogger, she’d be on Facebook, and
of course she’d also be tweeting away — but mostly about other
people, not herself.

That’s because Austen had a passionate fascination with
people and what made them who they were, an interest that keeps
the modern world fascinated by the woman who wrote novels set in
small villages nearly 200 years ago, said Laurel Ann Nattress,
editor of an anthology of Austen-inspired stories.

Nov 9, 2011

Doctor turned serial killer in WW2 Paris

TOKYO, Nov 9 (Reuters) – Nazi-occupied Paris was a terrible
place to be in the waning days of World War Two, with Jews,
Resistance fighters and ordinary citizens all hoping to escape.
Disappearances became so common they often weren’t followed up.

And one man used the lawlessness for his own terrible
purposes, killing perhaps as many as 150 people.

Oct 28, 2011

48 Hours in Tokyo

TOKYO (Reuters) – Futuristic, frustrating and fascinating sum up Tokyo, a city of contrasts where narrow alleys packed with dark, smoky restaurants lie within view of extravagant buildings that would fit into a “Batman” film.

Though shaken by the March 11 quake, Tokyo sustained little in the way of damage and life is back to normal, with international events such as Tokyo Fashion Week and the Tokyo International Film Festival going on as scheduled.

Oct 28, 2011

Travel Postcard: 48 Hours in Tokyo

TOKYO (Reuters) – Futuristic, frustrating and fascinating sum up Tokyo, a city of contrasts where narrow alleys packed with dark, smoky restaurants lie within view of extravagant buildings that would fit into a “Batman” film.

Though shaken by the March 11 quake, Tokyo sustained little in the way of damage and life is back to normal, with international events such as Tokyo Fashion Week and the Tokyo International Film Festival going on as scheduled.

Oct 27, 2011

Assassinated president’s story surprisingly fascinating

TOKYO (Reuters) – James Garfield, the 20th U.S. president, is a largely forgotten historical footnote because he was shot four months after taking office and died an agonizing two months later, serving only 200 days.

It is an undeserved fate for a surprisingly fascinating man, argues Candice Millard in her book “The Destiny of the Republic,” which twins the life stories of Garfield and Charles Guiteau, the deranged man who shot him.

Oct 27, 2011

Book Talk: The tale of a surprising historical footnote

TOKYO (Reuters) – James Garfield, the 20th U.S. president, is a largely forgotten historical footnote because he was shot four months after taking office and died an agonizing two months later, serving only 200 days.

It is an undeserved fate for a surprisingly fascinating man, argues Candice Millard in her book “The Destiny of the Republic,” which twins the life stories of Garfield and Charles Guiteau, the deranged man who shot him.

Oct 25, 2011

Neglected zombies get their time … in the shade

TOKYO (Reuters) – Zombies, the ugly cousin of more popular creatures such as werewolves and vampires, are experiencing a boost of fame that will finally get them some attention, according to Otto Penzler.

The editor of a recent anthology devoted solely to zombies believes they have been overlooked for too long.