Lifestyle/Entertainment Editor, Asia, Tokyo
Elaine's Feed
Nov 10, 2011

If Jane Austen lived today, she’d be a blogger

TOKYO, Nov 10 (Reuters) – Dear reader, if Jane Austen
lived today, she’d be an avid blogger, she’d be on Facebook, and
of course she’d also be tweeting away — but mostly about other
people, not herself.

That’s because Austen had a passionate fascination with
people and what made them who they were, an interest that keeps
the modern world fascinated by the woman who wrote novels set in
small villages nearly 200 years ago, said Laurel Ann Nattress,
editor of an anthology of Austen-inspired stories.

Nov 9, 2011

Doctor turned serial killer in WW2 Paris

TOKYO, Nov 9 (Reuters) – Nazi-occupied Paris was a terrible
place to be in the waning days of World War Two, with Jews,
Resistance fighters and ordinary citizens all hoping to escape.
Disappearances became so common they often weren’t followed up.

And one man used the lawlessness for his own terrible
purposes, killing perhaps as many as 150 people.

Oct 28, 2011

48 Hours in Tokyo

TOKYO (Reuters) – Futuristic, frustrating and fascinating sum up Tokyo, a city of contrasts where narrow alleys packed with dark, smoky restaurants lie within view of extravagant buildings that would fit into a “Batman” film.

Though shaken by the March 11 quake, Tokyo sustained little in the way of damage and life is back to normal, with international events such as Tokyo Fashion Week and the Tokyo International Film Festival going on as scheduled.

Oct 28, 2011

Travel Postcard: 48 Hours in Tokyo

TOKYO (Reuters) – Futuristic, frustrating and fascinating sum up Tokyo, a city of contrasts where narrow alleys packed with dark, smoky restaurants lie within view of extravagant buildings that would fit into a “Batman” film.

Though shaken by the March 11 quake, Tokyo sustained little in the way of damage and life is back to normal, with international events such as Tokyo Fashion Week and the Tokyo International Film Festival going on as scheduled.

Oct 27, 2011

Assassinated president’s story surprisingly fascinating

TOKYO (Reuters) – James Garfield, the 20th U.S. president, is a largely forgotten historical footnote because he was shot four months after taking office and died an agonizing two months later, serving only 200 days.

It is an undeserved fate for a surprisingly fascinating man, argues Candice Millard in her book “The Destiny of the Republic,” which twins the life stories of Garfield and Charles Guiteau, the deranged man who shot him.

Oct 27, 2011

Book Talk: The tale of a surprising historical footnote

TOKYO (Reuters) – James Garfield, the 20th U.S. president, is a largely forgotten historical footnote because he was shot four months after taking office and died an agonizing two months later, serving only 200 days.

It is an undeserved fate for a surprisingly fascinating man, argues Candice Millard in her book “The Destiny of the Republic,” which twins the life stories of Garfield and Charles Guiteau, the deranged man who shot him.

Oct 25, 2011

Neglected zombies get their time … in the shade

TOKYO (Reuters) – Zombies, the ugly cousin of more popular creatures such as werewolves and vampires, are experiencing a boost of fame that will finally get them some attention, according to Otto Penzler.

The editor of a recent anthology devoted solely to zombies believes they have been overlooked for too long.

Oct 20, 2011

Photographs of Kennedy funeral train inspire novel

TOKYO (Reuters) – Women brought flowers, people fell to their knees in anguish, young mothers held babies on their hips as Robert F. Kennedy’s funeral train passed. A boys’ baseball team, all in uniform, stood with their caps over their hearts.

These images, in photographs taken from the train that carried Kennedy’s body from New York to Washington after his June 1968 assassination, fascinated David Rowell so much that he used them as inspiration for “The Train of Small Mercies,” a novel that chronicles the day of the journey through the lives of several characters drawn from the photos.

Oct 19, 2011

Child mistreatment fuels novel of isolated teen

TOKYO, Oct XX (Reuters) – Roland Merullo had largely
forgotten the disturbing sight of a small child being mistreated
by his mother outside a store in rural New England — until the
memory welled up some twenty-five years later to help fuel the
novel he was writing.

That sort of abusive parenting, which Merullo likened to the
power of a dictator, underlies much of “The Talk-Funny Girl,”
the story of teenaged Marjorie and her struggles to escape from
the bleak life forced on her by her isolated parents, who are
falling more deeping under the influence of a sadistic cult
leader.

Oct 18, 2011

West Japan challenges Tokyo’s tasty Michelin crown

TOKYO (Reuters) – Western Japan challenged Tokyo on Tuesday for its status as the global center of gourmet dining, with the Michelin guide awarding area restaurants more of the coveted three-star ratings than those given to establishments in the capital.

A total of 15 restaurants in the Kansai area, which centers on Japan’s second-largest city of Osaka and the ancient capital of Kyoto, were awarded top three-star ratings, three more than last year and one more than Tokyo was given.