Comments on: Ubiquitous derivatives http://blogs.reuters.com/emanuelderman/2011/06/28/ubiquitous-derivatives/ Models.Behaving.Badly Fri, 14 Sep 2012 09:10:53 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: EmanuelDerman http://blogs.reuters.com/emanuelderman/2011/06/28/ubiquitous-derivatives/#comment-46 Mon, 11 Jul 2011 22:16:03 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/emanuelderman/?p=54#comment-46 I think Reuters has a lot on their plate besides me, but I will try mild haranguing. I’ve had trouble getting figures done nicely for my book too (these figures will be in it). But a book is ostensibly a permanent thing, so I expect them to take more care. A blog is meant to be more casual, so maybe sloppiness is OK. In the early days of the web there were people who seriously argued that the web was about info, not appearance, and that you shouldn’t aim for careful formatting. With a publisher, I expect more, but not clear that that’s the way it works.

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By: EllieK http://blogs.reuters.com/emanuelderman/2011/06/28/ubiquitous-derivatives/#comment-14 Wed, 06 Jul 2011 18:09:52 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/emanuelderman/?p=54#comment-14 Professor Derman,

I urge you to harangue the production staff at Reuters for more support with tasks such as image uploads. I tried very hard to read both versions of your Map of the Emotions, particularly the “color to black&white translation”.

Despite having an excellent video graphics card, high resolution display monitor, and cranking up the magnification to various levels between 1.5 and 3.0x, I was unable to achieve the same clarity typical of most images on the web. I could discern a few details, like your interesting choice of type face (it was Dante-esque, or maybe Toulouse-Latrec-ish). And I preferred the cloud-like thought bubbles for the three anchor emotions in your black&white version to the bland rectangles in the color chart. In fact, your translated chart was more effective in general, from what I could tell.

But all that effort you put into this should not go to waste! I want your blog on Reuters to be successful! (I am an operations research, M.B.A. finance, probability-statistics sort, you see). You must be given adequate production support so that your work can be fully appreciated!

P.S. I am not a big AI fan either. That entire singularity business is far too vaguely defined for me (not Kurzweil’s fault). Unfortunately, it also evokes thoughts of the Charles Stross version of “technological singularity” too. You might find that interesting, by the way.

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By: EmanuelDerman http://blogs.reuters.com/emanuelderman/2011/06/28/ubiquitous-derivatives/#comment-13 Tue, 05 Jul 2011 17:53:00 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/emanuelderman/?p=54#comment-13 I’m not a big AI fan, and so at first I was skeptical of your link, but it actually looks interesting. I will watch the video. Thanks. Reminds me of Galatea 2.2 by Richard Powers, 1995 book, on Wikipedia, which I liked.

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By: arel http://blogs.reuters.com/emanuelderman/2011/06/28/ubiquitous-derivatives/#comment-11 Fri, 01 Jul 2011 14:31:36 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/emanuelderman/?p=54#comment-11 Prof. Derman,
re Map of Emotions:
You might find the work being done in Singapore of interest
http://lovotics.com/
I was alerted to it via KurzweilAI.net
The implications for AI and learning machines e.g. Watson is important as I have thought for a very long time that the inability to “tag” objects and concepts with an emotional value was a major weakness in AI, machine intelligence and ultimately robotics

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