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Oct 5, 2011

Insight: What a stronger Chinese yuan means for the U.S.

By Emily Kaiser, Asia Economics Correspondent

(Reuters) – A sharp rise in China’s yuan currency might cut the U.S. trade deficit by as much as one third and create enough American jobs to put at least a modest dent in the unemployment rate.

Then again, it may also lead to a destabilizing spike in Chinese unemployment and spark a trade war that drags the global economy back into a deep recession.

Oct 5, 2011

What a stronger Chinese yuan means for the U.S.

Oct 5 (Reuters) – A sharp rise in China’s yuan currency
might cut the U.S. trade deficit by as much as one third and
create enough American jobs to put at least a modest dent in the
unemployment rate.

Then again, it may also lead to a destabilizing spike in
Chinese unemployment and spark a trade war that drags the global
economy back into a deep recession.

Oct 3, 2011

Asia, Europe factory activity slumps to crisis-era lows in Sept

LONDON (Reuters) – Factory activity in Europe and Asia slumped in September to levels not seen since the depths of the financial crisis as export demand dropped, surveys showed on Monday, reinforcing fears of a return to recession.

Corresponding figures for the United States due later on Monday are expected to underscore the gloomy outlook for the global economy.

Oct 3, 2011

Sept factory activity slumps to crisis-era lows

LONDON, Oct 3 (Reuters) – Factory activity in Europe and
Asia slumped in September to levels not seen since the depths of
the financial crisis as export demand dropped, surveys showed on
Monday, reinforcing fears of a return to recession.

Corresponding figures for the United States due later on
Monday are expected to underscore the gloomy outlook for the
global economy.

Oct 3, 2011

Asia’s factories downshift to crisis-era lows

Oct 3 (Reuters) – September factory activity in some of
Asia’s biggest economies slumped to levels last seen during the
depths of the financial crisis as export demand dropped,
reinforcing fears that fading U.S. and European growth will
spare no one.

Similar figures for Europe and the United States later on
Monday are expected to underscore the gloomy outlook for the
global economy.

Sep 26, 2011

From a soft patch to quicksand

Sept 25 (Reuters) – The global economy was supposed to be
better by now.

Just a few months ago, the prevailing wisdom was that
growth was going through a “soft patch” caused by a combination
of Japan’s earthquake and unrest in the oil-producing Middle
East. Once global supply chains got back to normal and oil
prices receded, the second-half recovery could begin.

Judging from the tone among world finance leaders who
gathered in Washington over the weekend, no one is buying that
theory any more.

Sep 25, 2011

Global economy weekahead: From a soft patch to quicksand

By Emily Kaiser, Asia Economics Correspondent

(Reuters) – The global economy was supposed to be better by now.

Just a few months ago, the prevailing wisdom was that growth was going through a “soft patch” caused by a combination of Japan’s earthquake and unrest in the oil-producing Middle East. Once global supply chains got back to normal and oil prices receded, the second-half recovery could begin.

Judging from the tone among world finance leaders who gathered in Washington over the weekend, no one is buying that theory any more.

Sep 23, 2011

Why China can’t and won’t save the world

Sept 23 (Reuters) – The most China can realistically do for
the struggling global economy is to ensure its own growth holds
up, and that won’t be nearly enough to lift the world.

Visions of China putting its $3.2 trillion in reserves to
work by launching another government spending spree or buying up
European bonds ignore the political and economic reality that
China, like any other country, puts its own needs first.

Sep 23, 2011

Insight – Why China can’t and won’t save the world

By Emily Kaiser, Asia Economics Correspondent

(Reuters) – The most China can realistically do for the struggling global economy is to ensure its own growth holds up, and that won’t be nearly enough to lift the world.

Visions of China putting its $3.2 trillion (2.07 trillion pounds) in reserves to work by launching another government spending spree or buying up European bonds ignore the political and economic reality that China, like any other country, puts its own needs first.

Sep 20, 2011

BRICs aid for Europe a tough sell in Asia

By Emily Kaiser, Asia Economics Correspondent

(Reuters) – Brazil will have a tough time convincing its risk-averse fellow BRICs to bankroll a European rescue no matter how the aid is structured.

Funneling the money through the International Monetary Fund instead of buying European debt directly offers a layer of protection against default. But India, China and Russia have already pledged a combined $70 billion (45 billion pounds) to augment the IMF’s lending power, and may be reluctant to do more.

    • About Emily

      "Emily Kaiser covers macroeconomics for Reuters. She focuses on big-picture stories, explaining trends in the U.S. economy for a global audience. Emily joined Reuters in 1996 as a commodities reporter covering grain markets and the Chicago Board of Trade. She moved to London in 2000 to cover European stock markets, and later covered large-cap U.S. retailers. She moved to Washington in 2007."
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