Comments on: Hoping for higher energy prices? http://blogs.reuters.com/environment/2008/07/31/hoping-for-higher-energy-prices/ Global environmental challenges Wed, 16 Nov 2016 08:14:55 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: Anubis http://blogs.reuters.com/environment/2008/07/31/hoping-for-higher-energy-prices/comment-page-1/#comment-335911 Sun, 03 Aug 2008 16:51:43 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/environment/2008/07/31/hoping-for-higher-energy-prices/#comment-335911 Cars with fuel injected engines can be modified to burn natural gas for around the price of a remanufactured transmission. Homes can be rewired for 12 to 24 volts which can operate lights and computer and small electronics. Industrial farming gets all of its fertilizer from oil. Then diesel fueled trucks must transport that food across the continent. Much of this food is nutritionaly lacking, and in the meantime all the good farmland near our big cities has been developed into housing, industrial parks and shopping malls. Clearly the free market is not equipped to provide solutions. We should stop debating amongst ourselves, and make all our voices heard in Washington D.C..

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By: Erik Kirschbaum http://blogs.reuters.com/environment/2008/07/31/hoping-for-higher-energy-prices/comment-page-1/#comment-335893 Fri, 01 Aug 2008 09:18:16 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/environment/2008/07/31/hoping-for-higher-energy-prices/#comment-335893 Hi Greg, Thanks for the question and the chance to clear up a common misunderstanding. Burning wood is carbon neutral. The burning wood gives off the same amount of CO2 as the same piece of wood would release if it were decomposing on the ground.
This link has more info:
http://www.thegreenguide.com/doc/ask/sto ve

A properly engineered woodburning system is by far a more eco-friendly source of heat than gas, oil, or electricity produced from non-renewable resources. Like all renewable energies, though, attention to every aspect of the process is necessary—from the origin of the fuel to its final release as gas and smoke. In this way, wood can be fully exploited as a smart alternative to non-renewable energy sources.

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By: greg http://blogs.reuters.com/environment/2008/07/31/hoping-for-higher-energy-prices/comment-page-1/#comment-335889 Thu, 31 Jul 2008 19:23:26 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/environment/2008/07/31/hoping-for-higher-energy-prices/#comment-335889 I hardly see how using wood instead of natural gas is reducing emmisions…. you are most likely making it worse.

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By: DS1Roger http://blogs.reuters.com/environment/2008/07/31/hoping-for-higher-energy-prices/comment-page-1/#comment-335887 Thu, 31 Jul 2008 16:56:05 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/environment/2008/07/31/hoping-for-higher-energy-prices/#comment-335887 Until we remove the need for transportation we need an energy source that provides that function.
We have a SUV and still only fill up about once a month. Until the cost of gas gets to the $6 mark changing to a more effecient car for us is not cost effective. Consider how much energy was used to create the automobile you drive? Throwing that away for a small increase in your gas millage is also a waste of energy.
Besides that we were able to bring back a snow blower (yes it uses gas. I challenge you to shovel 8 inches of blowing snow 10 times a year from your driveway! Global warming BHAH!) ,lawn mower , wood for home improvements and much more not possible with other vehicles.

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By: Ptrizzle http://blogs.reuters.com/environment/2008/07/31/hoping-for-higher-energy-prices/comment-page-1/#comment-335886 Thu, 31 Jul 2008 16:06:08 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/environment/2008/07/31/hoping-for-higher-energy-prices/#comment-335886 I am in agreeance that higher prices will create change, which withouth a doubt, is neccessary. But to say that you actually hope fuel prices to continue climbing is not very…well, for lack of a better word, its not very “humane”. Energy costs that rise to fast will create increases across the board: food, transportation, medicine, etc. All these goods/services depend on cheap energy to get from one place to the next. And poor people, the most affected by this, are the least equipped to handle.
So, in essence, yes this will spur world leaders to rethink energy sources, but at what cost to human life? Don’t go wishing for quick fixes with no side-effects. Ask any scientist and he will tell you that, in the long run, there is no such thing as “having your cake and eating it too” in the world we live in.

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