Cracking views of Antarctic icebergs

January 23, 2009

As a view out of your home it’s hard to match — a constantly changing vista of icebergs just outside the British Antarctic Survey’s Rothera research station.

Every day the winds and tides on the Antarctic Peninsula shift them around — some break up  abruptly with a loud splash while many simply slowly grind into ice cubes against the shore and disappear. I’ve tried to take a picture every day from the main balcony here (there’s a metal mast on the right hand side of each photo).

Walking along the shore here you can hear a bubbling as air in the ice melts out into the water. The old ice is the clearest — good for putting in cold drinks. Some form gravity-defying shapes such as arches or big holes — one in the bay a few days ago looked like a giant catamaran.

Icebergs cracking off glaciers in the distance can sound like an artillery shell exploding and big lumps falling into the sea send a wave across the bay. Seals lie on the beach, some of them snoring or nonchalantly scratching themselves — completely unbothered by the people passing by.

 

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2 comments

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very cool

Posted by jay jay | Report as abusive

Antarctic melting is way more serioues than people truly believe. It seems although people are ignorant when it comes to how much an issue such as the ice caps melting. The increased water levels and reduction of habitats that are very important to arctic marine life will soon demonstrate the power of global warming, unfortunately.

Fred Smilek is the acting president of the Society to Save Endangered Species. It was founded two years ago by Fred Smilek along with his two best friends Charles and Jonathan. The Society to Save Endangered Species has blossomed from a minute organization with three members to one with more than ten members. Since its inception the organization has been able to raise nearly $25,000 in funds.
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Posted by hornetsquad | Report as abusive