Comments on: What about China? http://blogs.reuters.com/environment/2009/12/12/what-about-china/ Global environmental challenges Wed, 16 Nov 2016 08:14:55 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: scheng1 http://blogs.reuters.com/environment/2009/12/12/what-about-china/comment-page-1/#comment-343717 Sun, 13 Dec 2009 14:58:32 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/environment/?p=15233#comment-343717 China government is very powerful and forceful, and it has the means to do more.
I wonder if China has in mind to build another “three gorges dam” for Yellow River. That will definitely cut down the need for power station using fossil fuel.

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By: khalfsen http://blogs.reuters.com/environment/2009/12/12/what-about-china/comment-page-1/#comment-343704 Sat, 12 Dec 2009 21:37:19 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/environment/?p=15233#comment-343704 China’s pledge to reduce its’s carbon intensity (CO2 emission per GDP) by 40 to 45 per cent before 2020 with 2005 as a base year, is a ‘first’ when it comes to climate policy obligation for China. This is encouraging.

China has reduced it’s carbon intensisty at an impressive rate since 1985, but it is still well above typical industrialized countries level. At the same time the per capita emissions of CO2 is less than half of a typical western level. It has been estimated that the Chinese intensity target will reduce CO2 emissions by 15-20 per cent in 2020 compared to a business as usual scenario. This is within the range of 15 to 30 per cent that has been indicated as necessary contributions from developing countries in order to meet the 2 degree target. The developed countries will at the same time have to reduce their emissions by 20 to 45 per cent compared to 1990 levels if we should be within reach of that target. The current pledges from the rich world is at present far from enough. Thus, my conclusion is that China is in fact doing its fair share, but is in a position to do more. Sadly, that applies even more strongly to the industrialized countries.

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