Environment Forum

Walruses in Louisiana? Eyebrow-raising details of BP’s spill response plan

May 27, 2010

LIFE WALRUSLouisiana walruses? Seals swimming along the Gulf Coast?

These creatures normally live in the Arctic Ocean, not the Gulf of Mexico, but they’re listed as “sensitive biological resources” that could be affected by an oil spill in the area in a document filed by BP last June with the U.S. Minerals Management Service. More than a month after BP’s Deepwater Horizon rig blew out and sank on April 20, the British oil giant’s regional spill response plan drew some severe criticism from the watchdog group Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility.

One problem with BP’s nearly 600-page spill response plan? “It was utterly useless in the event of a spill,” Jeff Ruch, PEER’s executive director, said by telephone. His group, which acts as a kind of safe haven for government whistle-blowers, detailed what it called “outright inanities”  in BP’s filing and the government’s approval of it.

PEER noted BP’s plan referred to “sea lions, seals, sea otters (and) walruses” as wildlife that might be affected in the Gulf of Mexico, and suggested this reference was taken from a previous plan for Arctic exploratory drilling, where these animals could be affected.

The BP plan lists a Japanese shopping and search website as a link to one of its “primary equipment providers” for rapid deployment in the event of a spill in the Gulf of Mexico. And it directs its media spokespeople never to make “promises that property, ecology or anything else will be restored to normal.”

Ruch said the plan contains no information about tracking sub-surface oil plumes from deepwater blowouts or preventing disease transmission to captured animals in rehab facilities, a serious risk after the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill.

OIL-RIG/LEAK

The section on “worst case discharge” estimates a maximum spill of 177,400 barrels in the Gulf of Mexico. A panel of U.S. experts estimated that as of May 17, there were at least 130,000 barrels of oil on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico and a similar amount had been skimmed off the surface or evaporated, making a total of at least 260,000 barrels from the Deepwater Horizon spill. As of May 27, the broken well was still leaking.

Photo credits: REUTERS/Stringer (Walrus swims in the pool at Moscow’s zoo, February 28, 2001)

REUTERS/Hans Deryk (U.S. veterinarians bathe a brown pelican at Fort Jackson Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in Buras, Louisiana, May 15, 2010)

Comments
4 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

The Obama Administration may not have in-house expertise necessary to take over containment efforts, but the President and his Attorney General, Eric Holder, certainly have a lot of legal expertise. Hopefully they will employ that expertise to seek the maximum possible punishments for what appears to be a willful disregard by BP of its legal obligation to develop a legitimate spill response plan.

Posted by HowleyGreen | Report as abusive
 

Check the relative salaries of environmental professionals employed by oil companies and their consultants and then the salaries of production engineers and accountants. It is no mystery why the environmental response plan is a cut and paste job.

Posted by geosue | Report as abusive
 

I was an environmental consultant for 15 years and continue to work in the environmental profession. There is no excuse for a cut and paste job regardless of salary; I see it all the time.

Posted by environmentp | Report as abusive
 

And to think, our oh-so-competent Federal Government approved that response plan. I wonder if BP has decided that their ROI for the Obama Campaign in 08 was a huge waste of money. THAT’s where the dividend money went.

Posted by LoriGirl | Report as abusive
 

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