Environment Forum

Goodbye, Green Business

November 29, 2011


Starting Dec. 1, 2011, Reuters.com is changing the way it publishes news about companies that make money supporting the environment or damaging it. We are saying goodbye to the Green Business section.

Reuters will continue to bring you the clean economy news you need to know. Our top-notch team of correspondents around the world will continue to cover issues like the Keystone XL pipeline, the solar trade war with China and the Durban U.N. Conference on Climate Change. The biggest stories, as always, will appear on our homepage, like those about plummeting carbon prices. But we will not be packaging green business stories on their own real estate any longer, and we will not be showcasing news by our esteemed editorial partners including Matter Network, InsideClimate News and GreenBiz.com.

Stories about energy will be published here, and those about environmental policy and climate change can be found here. And Reuters online editor Carla Tonelli can still be found on twitter (@carla_tonelli).

One of the goals of the sustainability movement is to integrate its objectives into all facets of business. In this light, Reuters.com is ahead of the game as we enter a time when solar panel companies are mainstream enough to be on the regular business page and not siphoned off to a private green niche.

Of course, green companies, technology and economies are not going away. At Reuters.com we embrace this opportunity to bring the business of the environment into the fold of the rest of the site, and welcome you to continue your dialogue with us as we branch out to yet another new chapter.

Comments
9 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Just as Bloomberg unveils a Sustainability site that blankets the topic, Reuters retreats. Portraying this as being “ahead of the game” and deriding your previous effort as a “private green niche” is a bit of fanciful spin. This is more like an ill-timed retreat that makes Reuters look increasingly out of touch.

Posted by Mandrake | Report as abusive
 

In spite of numerous efforts by the University of Alberta and many other geological bodies, Reuters continues to call Alberta’s resource tarsands.
This is both technically and economically incorrect.
The Bituminous sands of Alberta when processed converts to bitumen which then converts to OIL. The Oil is broken down to Gas Oil, Kerosene and Naptha in various percentages according to client demand. Tar is an ancient name for the resource but Alberta makes no tar as that is man made. Please threrefore advise all your energy and other writers that the StockMarket/Universities/Industry/Govern ment all call it OILSANDS. Thank you kindly.

Posted by Groundbeef | Report as abusive
 

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Posted by sikhaonirban | Report as abusive
 

Zaroorat – A Need is a Green Yatra Initiative, which works on a premise that one man’s waste

can be another man’s richness. It is not only possible, but realistically doable. Zaroorat – A

Need project does not wait for disasters to strike before we are ready to provide for basic

human living needs. It’s a bank that makes a difference as it does not deal in money, but in old

Clothes, Toys, Books, Stationary etc. and other lots of basic needs durable goods, one of the

basic human needs after food and shelter.

“The main objective of Zaroorat – A Need is to provide the necessity things to millions of poor

and needy people facing great hardship and health risk due to lack of proper clothing and other

basic things in far flung areas and urban slums of the country. We work towards nullifying the

misbalance caused by us, our society, and people; and urge the “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and

Realize” mentality in living our daily lives here on our beautiful planet Earth.

You can donate almost everything like books, stationary, clothes, utensils, electrical appliances

(Mobile, computer), bed sheets, toys, blankets, shoes, sporting goods….. Anything that you

don’t use anymore might help someone in need. These items will be sorted, repaired, sewed,

packed, transported and distributed to the rural areas & urban slums throughout India.

Zaroorat – A Need is a united sustainable effort that works through your valuable contributions.

The collection, sorting, sewing, packing, repairing of electronic products, transportation and

distribution of clothes and other things are done with a proper planning, management and

execution. We have several dedicated teams who look after different phases of work. This

whole process cost us a small budget per piece.

Posted by Zaroorat | Report as abusive
 

You are right that we will never lose green energy. I just assume that we will always be coming up with more and new ideas about green energy. Thanks

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Posted by homewaterfilter | Report as abusive
 

Very good article i also run environmetal news blog link to which is http://envirocivil.com/ can you please suggest me how to improve it

Posted by kamranali123 | Report as abusive
 

Makes sense to me, these issues now are so mainstream I tend to agree that they don’t need a separate channel.

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Posted by PaulDowning1234 | Report as abusive
 

This is really a very good article. Green energy will always be present, along with the new ideas coming on how to improve or use it properly.

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Posted by Anonymous | Report as abusive
 

Great Post! this information should be shared with everyone. Thanks for sharing, it much appreciated.

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Posted by Anonymous | Report as abusive
 

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