Environment Forum

from Reuters Investigates:

Solar energy vs wildlife

Sarah McBride reports on brewing battles between environmentalists in her special report: "With solar power, it's Green vs. Green."

It turns out the perfect place to build a big solar plant is often also the perfect place for a tortoise or a fox to live. This means developers of large-scale solar plants are running into legal challenges from people who one would expect to be natural allies of alternative energy providers.

Here's a map of some of the more contentious projects.

One local resident of the Panoche Valley, Sallie Calhoun, had this to say:

"I am passionate about preserving open space," she says, adding she believes the solar plant achieves that goal. "The idea that we're going to protect every lizard, every drainage, seems counterproductive."

 

It's a tough dilemma for environmentalists. Tell us what you think?

To read the special report in multimedia PDF format, click here.

Tessera sells Calico solar project to K Road Power

IMG_2575NTR’s Tessera Solar has sold its 663.5-megawatt Calico solar power project to K Road Power less than a week after utility Southern California Edison canceled a long-standing contract to buy electricity from the power plant that was to be built in the Mojave Desert.

Terms of the sale were not disclosed.

The deal is the latest twist for Calico, which nine weeks ago won approval from California and federal regulators after being put on a fast track so as to qualify for then-expiring tax incentives for renewable energy projects.

Tessera also received the green light for its 709-megawatt Imperial Valley solar power plant but had not secured the financing to build the $4.6 billion pair of projects.

Utility cancels contract for Tessera’s Calico solar project

IMG_2575NTR’s Tessera Solar has suffered a major setback with the loss of a 663.5-megawatt power purchase agreement with utility Southern California Edison for its Calico solar power plant project.

The abrupt cancellation of the five-year-old contract comes just eight weeks after California and federal officials approved Calico, which they put on a fast track so Tessera could qualify for lucrative government incentives for large-scale renewable energy projects.

Neither the utility nor Tessera would comment on the reasons for scrapping the 20-year power purchase agreement, citing confidentiality provisions. Signed in August 2005, it was one of the largest contracts for electricity to be generated by a single solar thermal power plant.

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