Events

Bill Murray explains that golf cart incident

September 3, 2007

rtr1m8qf.jpgActor Bill Murray gave us a long explanation for his bizarre antics in Stockholm last month, when he was picked up by police and tested for drunk driving after being found at the wheel of a golf cart en route to his downtown hotel.

In Venice to promote “The Darjeeling Limited”, Wes Anderson’s latest comedy in which Murray plays a nameless businessman who appears in short scenes at the beginning and end of the film, a deadpan Murray was asked: “What the heck were you doing in that golf car in Stockholm?”

It was an unusually direct question from a group of journalists who tend to presage their questions with long and rambling praise for whichever film they are talking about.

And the answer?

“I was in Stockholm. A friend of mine, Jesper Parnevik, invited me to play in a pro-am golf tourament in Stockholm and I was driven to a party celebrating the event in a golf cart, and after the party the people that drove me in the golf cart did not wish to drive, so I said ‘I can drive’ and I drove. I ended up stopping and dropping people off on the way like a bus. I had about six people in the thing and I dropped them off one at a time and as the last couple were getting out also wished to be dropped off at a Seven Eleven — I didn’t know they had Seven Elevens in Stockholm — they just asked me to come over, and assumed that I was drunk, and I tried to explain to them that I was a golfer.”

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Any one who has played golf knows drinking is involved. well, the people I play with do. Any way, drunk driving is drunk driving and Mr. Murry must face the punishment. Look at the bright side, a golf cart usually goes 10-15 mph, better then a car going 70-80. I thought the rich had people to drive for them?

Posted by OD Bigg Dogg | Report as abusive
 

Oh Yea, theres always alcohol involved on any of the courses I’ve been on. You are right though, the law is the law and he should pay just like everyone else.

 

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