FaithWorld

Telegram diplomacy, Vatican style

July 14, 2008

What do Albania, Greece, Turkey, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Afghanistan,  Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia and Indonesia have in common?
Their heads of state all received identical or nearly identical telegrams from Pope Benedict as his plane was flying over their countries on the way from Rome to Australia to preside at the Roman Catholic Church’s World Day of Youth.
sydney.jpgThe telegrams said “FLYING OVER (NAME OF COUNTRY) EN ROUTE TO AUSTRALIA FOR THE CELEBRATION OF WORLD YOUTH DAY, I SEND CORDIAL GREETINGS TO YOU AND TO ALL YOUR FELLOW-CITIZENS, ALONG WITH THE ASSURANCE OF MY PRAYERS THAT ALMIGHTY GOD WILL BLESS THE NATION WITH PEACE AND PROSPERITY. BENEDICTUS PP. XVI.
That was the version received by heads of state of countries whose majority of citizens practice one of the three monotheistic religions. The others, where other religions such as Hinduism and Buddhism are practiced, received a slightly different version  in which the phrase “invoking divine blessings” replaced the phrase “that almighty God will bless the nation”. 
But one could not help but wonder why the telegrams were virtually identical (apart from the God/divine difference) even though the situation in the various countries hardly is.  Current events in Greece, for example, are hardly similar to those in Myanmar or Afghanistan.
When he flew over countries, the late Pope John Paul would sometimes tailor his telegrams to reflect the situation on the ground, even if only obliquely. So, when reporters aboard Benedict’s  plane were handed out 18 telegrams, some read them expecting, or hoping, that a  straightforward or diplomatically creative tea-leaves message might be found in those being beamed to hot spots such as Afghanistan, which is engulfed in war, Myanmar, which is still trying to recover from the devastation of Cyclone Nargis and whose human rights record has prompted concern by the international community, or Vietnam, with which the Vatican hopes to soon establish full diplomatic relations after decades of tensions.
Granted, telegrams are not the building blocks of any state’s diplomacy. But of all the countries that were flown over, the pope has only visited one (Turkey) and perhaps this is the closest he will come to most of the rest of them. 
And, a little old-style tea leaves reading would have helped reporters who clocked more than 20 hours of flying with the pope between Rome and Sydney kill a little time.
And maybe even have produced a story or two more.  

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Even though nearly the entire WORLD does not want the self-appointed fool anywhere near them, or their children, Ben dict us pp XVI believes he can bless some-
one.

Cordial greetings will not repair the world of damage he
has caused. With “assurances” about his praying to the
Almighty must be about finding more children to ruin.

Will popus payus? I didn’t think so. Not enough money in the Vatican, you say? Lier. The monstrous acts
the vatican has performed while accumulating the world’s
wealth is never quite forgotten before another intrusive
oration crawls it’s way down from off the lips of this
monster.

The pope, as some call him, says he blesses us. Is that
before of after I have an abortion? Does he bless me as
soon as I get a divorce? Does he also bless me when I mo-
lest children or do I need a lot of money for the big
ones? Can he bless me when I try to forget what horrible inhumanities have been committed by rome throughout the world–throughout history? I try to for-
give and forget but it is hard when you, dressed in funny clothing, holding most of the world’s finances
through lies and deceit, say you bless me while children around the world STARVE. You have not blessed anyone so far, except for those who have found you out.

One fine day when all God’s children that have been
aborted, stand before you, pope, and say, “why did you kill us”?, will you bless them then?

Posted by al | Report as abusive
 

I see the Pope as the head of a mafia-type of money-making organisation of titanic proportiona.

He is NOT the only representative of God on earth as he would pretend to be – that is a ludicrous claim and goes back to the Catholic churches origins when it was formed from the remains of the ancient Roman mafia. It was a way of furthering the mafia racket – and remember, there were once two popes – bothing fighting for supremacy via numerous bloody battles.

The whole thing is rotten. The Vatican even has its own secret service, which in the past has been linked to clandestine murders and executions – which would be in keeping witht history of violence, torture and skulduggery of labyrinthine and massive proportions.

Wearing his ridiculously outdated and over-the-top garb, he looks ridiculous.

The Catholic church has also become the last refuge for the bigot and many practicing Catholics are among the most bigoted and hypocritical on the planet.

I would like to see the Catholic church reformed without a pope and much of it’s multi-billion fortune distributed back to the people it was filched from.

That wold be in keeping with the doctrine of Jesus Christ, I feel.

While dirt poor people are continually extorted for the little money they have in order to swell the coffers of a greedy and ruthless church, then justice will be trampled on.

The is something digusting, anti-Christian and morally reprehensible about the Pope supporting a system that was originally a reflection of the way the mafia extorts money from people.

Protection mopney – yes, something like that!

Posted by The Truth Is... | Report as abusive
 

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