FaithWorld

See how and why France’s Muslim Council doesn’t work

October 6, 2008

CFCM leaders representing (from left) Muslims from Turkey, mixed groups, Morocco and Algeria, 22 June 2008/Gonzalo FuentesAs the official umbrella group for Europe’s largest Muslim minority, the French Council of the Muslim Faith (CFCM) should play an important role in integrating Islam into French society. In fact, it hardly has any influence at all. The CFCM is so split by internal differences that it can hardly agree on when Ramadan should start or end. The link above is to the Wikipedia entry on the CFCM because the council has not been able to get its act together sufficiently to produce its own website.

France 24, the all-news TV station Paris launched two years ago as a kind of “French CNN,” has produced an excellent report on the CFCM — “Divisions within French Islam deepen at Ramadan.” It zooms in on the rivalry between Algerian and Moroccan Muslim groups that has crippled the council from the start. In one of the France 24 logomost telling scenes in the report, the Algerian and Moroccan groups meet separately at the (Algerian-run) Grand Mosque of Paris before a joint session where they argue about how to decide when Ramadan ends. The discussion got so heated that journalists were asked to leave the room.

The report also has interviews with leading figures in the CFCM as well as observers and critics. In all, an insightful report into the politics of Islam in France today.

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

I’d really like to know just who it is that “elects” these various Muslim “councils” throughout Europe.
Or are they just self appointed?

Posted by Alan C. | Report as abusive
 

The rules are different from country to country. The French council is elected by Muslims themselves, who vote at their mosques for candidates put forward by the main Muslim organisations (which are mostly divided along ethnic lines, whether they are backed by Morocco, Algeria, Turkey, etc).

Posted by Tom Heneghan | Report as abusive
 

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