Christian-Muslim statement on world financial crisis

October 15, 2008

Common Word conference at University of Cambridge, 11 Oct 2008/Sohail NakhoodaThe Common Word group of Muslim scholars met Christian leaders and theologians in Cambridge and London this week. Discussions in this interfaith dialogue have mostly been theological, based on the idea that the love of God and neighbour is a core dogma of both religions. In a statement on Wednesday, they included a paragraph about the world financial crisis. There have been lots of comments from various faith leaders about the crisis, but this is the first Christian-Muslim statement I’ve seen.

Here’s the paragraph:

We live in an increasingly global world that brings with it increased interdependence.  The closer we are drawn together by this globalisation and interdependence, the more urgent is the need to understand and respect one another in order to find a way out of our troubles.  Meeting at a time of great turbulence in the world financial system our hearts go out to the many people throughout the world whose lives and livelihood are affected by the current crisis.  When a crisis of this magnitude occurs, we are all tempted to think solely of ourselves and our families and ignore the treatment of minorities and the less fortunate.  In this conference we are celebrating the shared values of love of God and love of neighbour, the basis of A Common Word, whilst reflecting self-critically on how often we fall short of these standards.  We believe that the divine commandment to love our neighbour should prompt all people to act with compassion towards others, to fulfil their duty of helping to alleviate misery and hardship.  It is out of an understanding of shared values that we urge world leaders and our faithful everywhere to act together to ensure that the burden of this financial crisis, and also the global environmental crisis, does not fall unevenly on the weak and the poor.  We must seize the opportunity for implementing a more equitable global economic system that also respects our role as stewards of the earth’s resources.

Do you see any link between faith and the financial crisis? Could this crisis lead to tensions between people of different religions — or bring them closer together?

One comment

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As I’m putting on my site 4 Hurting Christians that all this was obviously known about, yet allowed to happen.
Can only be two reasons, first not to panic everyone, so keep quiet, hope it goes away.
Secondly as I’m researching and a believer in the last days, obvious that the Global elite want more control over us.
Create, or least allow a crisis and then pretend to be solving it and do that by introducing more measures.
Terrorism did this, now this is doing the same, we go along with it because of fear and we have no choice.
Those that were in debt to the banks are no in debt to the government with loans that eventually have to be paid back, with the tax payers money.

Don’t say I’m alright, I’m in a building society as my site’s provided links, and proof, it will affect you too.
Anyone and everyone will suffer, as they reclaim it one way or another, whether through tax on cars again, or petrol, or tax on the pay packet, or cuts in services, or council tax rises, they will get it back.
I predict worse to come, and I’m not expert or prophet, but unlike Peter Jones of Dragons Den, saying things are now on the up, anyone can see what is coming, due to all the factors put together, credit card debt, 10p tax scrapped, house prices falling, people behind in mortgages and unemployment and, list is endless and spirals out of control, unless action is taken, trouble is, that action takes away more of our freedoms, and masses go along with it, because the delusion is that it’s doing some good, getting rid of the fat cats etc.
But it comes down to control, if you are in debt, then someone owns you.

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