FaithWorld

Chavez takes moral high ground, closes “Bodies Revealed”

March 9, 2009

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez’s closure of the “Bodies Revealed” exhibition of dissected human cadavers and subsequent confiscation of the bodies is perhaps the strongest government reaction yet to the worldwide trend for the traveling art and science shows that have been seen by millions.

VENEZUELA/

Chavez called the exhibition a sign of worldwide “moral decomposition,” adding to criticism of similar shows by the Roman Catholic church in Canada and controversy over the origin of the bodies when an exhibit arrived in New York. One academic cited Dante’s Inferno to describe the “Body World” exhibit as “Dead Body Porn.”

Chavez is a fervent Christian and frequently makes reference to Jesus Christ, who he says was the “first socialist.”

At times he shows a morally conservative side declaring himself a feminist but speaking out against abortion, which is illegal in Venezuela except in cases of a threat to the life of a pregnant woman.

(Photo: Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, shown here with his Panamanian counterpart Martin Torrijos  has taken the moral high ground, and not for the first time. REUTERS/Miraflores Palace/Handout, March 3, 2009)

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Why doesn´t anybody talk about the bigger problem facing Honduras, and that is the almost certain civil war that is going to be organized by Hugo Chavez.

Posted by Gino Tentori | Report as abusive
 

I note from your photograph that your head comes to a point. My condolences.
I also want to give you condolences re some 30,000 guns being melted down into a pile of only 5 tons. Perhaps you weren’t taught anything about mathematics, probabilities nor truth.
If you are using the mouthings of Chavez for any of your reporting, please remember what country grows the most dope in the world.

Posted by Catscratch | Report as abusive
 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/