Comments on: Philanthropy outlook upbeat, but not for religious charities http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/2009/07/30/philanthropy-outlook-upbeat-but-not-for-religious-charities/ Religion, faith and ethics Sat, 23 Apr 2016 23:25:07 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: Tom Heneghan http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/2009/07/30/philanthropy-outlook-upbeat-but-not-for-religious-charities/comment-page-1/#comment-14090 Fri, 31 Jul 2009 15:13:02 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/?p=7299#comment-14090 Monte Sahlin, many thanks for this very interesting comment. You give the balance I was looking for but didn’t have the info to hand. It makes a lot more sense that religious donations have a much wider base with lower contributions that the big-ticket charity giving they’re talking about here. Having British donors in the sample also has to skew the results. I hope anyone who reads my post follows through and reads your comment too. I’ll flag that in the post.

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By: Monte Sahlin http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/2009/07/30/philanthropy-outlook-upbeat-but-not-for-religious-charities/comment-page-1/#comment-14086 Thu, 30 Jul 2009 23:11:44 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/?p=7299#comment-14086 The results of this study are out of line with most of the research about giving to religious causes. For example, the 2009 trend report from the Giving USA Foundation includes the fact that religious organizations in the U.S. reported a 5.5 percent increase in donations last year, the first year in a long time that there was a decline in overall charitable giving (down 2 percent). The March 19 (2009) issue of Philanthropy Journal includes a report from the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability that donations to three quarters of its member organizations held steady or increased in the last quarter of 2008. The Wall Street Journal of May 24 (2009) quotes the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University that in a recession “giving to education and the arts are typically hit hardest, while … religious organizations feel little impact.”How did the Barclays-sponsored study come up with such a different finding? Two explanations come immediately to mind: (1) The study includes both British and American respondents. Attitudes about both giving and religion are much different in the U.K. than they are in America and this particular finding about religion may be driven more by the U.K. respondents than the American. (2) The sample for the Barclays study is, by definition, taken entirely from among the wealthy. The report from the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability notes that “small donations of $10 to $100 were relatively unaffected and in some cases … increased.” The Barclay’s study may reflect the attitudes toward religion on the part of the relatively few wealthy donors and not that of the general population of givers.

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