Comments on: Tahir ul-Qadri and the difficulty of reporting on fatwas http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/2010/03/02/tahir-ul-qadri-and-the-difficulty-of-reporting-on-fatwas/ Religion, faith and ethics Sat, 23 Apr 2016 23:25:07 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: AqeelRana http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/2010/03/02/tahir-ul-qadri-and-the-difficulty-of-reporting-on-fatwas/comment-page-1/#comment-24366 Sat, 29 May 2010 16:22:55 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/?p=12155#comment-24366 great work by Dr. Tahir-ul-Qadri. we proud of Al-Qadri.

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By: Sadii http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/2010/03/02/tahir-ul-qadri-and-the-difficulty-of-reporting-on-fatwas/comment-page-1/#comment-24302 Sun, 23 May 2010 15:30:48 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/?p=12155#comment-24302 Thx God someone spoke and defended Islam proving it has no relation with terosim.Some mentally sick poeple are ignoring what is stated just bkz WHO said it.
I wonder how can one kill several ppl in hospitalz n markets thinking that he iz going to do sumthng for palistine or Kashmir????????No doubt Qadri has snatched Islam from handz of so called muslim mujahidz like Osama bin Laden nd Mula omer etc.

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By: AbuOmar http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/2010/03/02/tahir-ul-qadri-and-the-difficulty-of-reporting-on-fatwas/comment-page-1/#comment-23835 Sun, 14 Mar 2010 05:36:24 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/?p=12155#comment-23835 http://arabnews.com/middleeast/article29 681.ece

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By: DRHolman http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/2010/03/02/tahir-ul-qadri-and-the-difficulty-of-reporting-on-fatwas/comment-page-1/#comment-23799 Wed, 10 Mar 2010 16:51:30 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/?p=12155#comment-23799 AbuOmar:

Do you think he had idea of the pain and suffering of the victims in New York City, the Philippines, Nigeria and other places throughout the world where militant Muslims have embraced fear and violence as a means to spread their convictions? In Palenstine and Pakistan the suffering are just as often the victims of Muslims as anyone else. In Afghanistan…who attacked who?
Do some research. In the history of the world’s wars, “religious wars” area a vast minority. However, take a guess which religion has instigated over 75% of those wars…and the pain and suffering of their victims?

I applaud the fatwa for at least defending the honor of the vast number of muslims in the world who agree with it. The radicals have misrepresented them way too long. Maybe this will be the start of “retaking” Islam from the extremist.

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By: AbuOmar http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/2010/03/02/tahir-ul-qadri-and-the-difficulty-of-reporting-on-fatwas/comment-page-1/#comment-23795 Mon, 08 Mar 2010 03:52:08 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/?p=12155#comment-23795 Wasn’t it to please Americans and their puppets.
Never in history has anyone boasted of the number of pages of a ‘Fatwa’. 600 hundred pages. Good for Guinness Book of World Records. Seems he wants ‘million $’ award from Uncle Sam.

“The embodiment of Sunnah” is yet another self donned title of the Sheikul Islam. What next? “embodiment of Quran”?! Saint?! “embodiment of Light”?!

Seems he had no idea of the pain and suffering of the victims in Palestine, Afghanistan, Iraq, N.W. Pakistan, Kashmir.

Abdullah from Kashmir

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By: imranmakhdum http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/2010/03/02/tahir-ul-qadri-and-the-difficulty-of-reporting-on-fatwas/comment-page-1/#comment-23785 Sat, 06 Mar 2010 21:34:15 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/?p=12155#comment-23785 “mootu beghaizkum” alQURAN i am replying the guy who quoted urdu verse, It (verse) means “oh (jealous ones)die out in ur jealousy and agony, THESE WERE THE PEOPLE OF ANRCHY LOVING NATURE , who could not the message of love and tolrence even in the times of the HOLY PROPHET S.A.W., So they used to cut their fingers when ever they came out of the COURT OF THE PROPHET S.A.W , The brother himself quoted”Changes colours between Sufism, scholarship, politics and what not” Really it was a 100%appriciation about the sheikh ul ISLAM , REALLY HE (DR. QADRI)IS A CLASSIC IN HIS APPROACH , AN THE COMPLETE EMBODIMENT OF SUNNAH , i hope voices like ur s no longer ll be heard by the youth of the era , cause now enough is enough

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By: imranmakhdum http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/2010/03/02/tahir-ul-qadri-and-the-difficulty-of-reporting-on-fatwas/comment-page-1/#comment-23784 Sat, 06 Mar 2010 21:22:12 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/?p=12155#comment-23784 Hi, the evry one , the genleman from Isalmic world has removed the dust from the face of Islam which unfortunately has been thrown at by our ignorant and extremist companions , HE VERY CLEARLY ELOBORATED AND PLEADED THAT ISLAM HAS NO TERRITORY WITH VIOLENCE AN TERRORISM, from historic islamic sources of knowlege , which r no doubt the authentic one QURAN SUNNAH THE PROPHET S COMPANIONS,HE CITED VERY SIGNIFICANT TRADITIONS THAT ALQAIDA , AN ATHREER ,SUCH LIKE ORGANISATIONS ARE MENTIONED IN THE HOLY PROPHETS TRADITIONS THESE ARE OUT OF ISLAM , THEY ARE NONBELIVERS , FOR THE FIRST TIME HE INITIATED THAT THEY ARE “TERRORISTS ” ARE SIMPLY NON /DISBELIVERS WITH OUT ANY “IF” OR BUT ” CAUSE SUCH WORDS R USED SM TIMES TO JUSTIFY THEIR ACTS OF MASSACERS WONDER FUL I WOULD LIKE THAT THE UMMAH SHOULD COME FORWARD BE IT THE ARAB WORLD OR THE WESTERN WORLD TO BACK HIM UP , REALLY THE MAN HAS THE CAPCITY TO REFORM THE OPINION, AN WISH THAT MEDIA SHOULD ALSO GIVE WARM COVERAGE

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By: AbuOmar http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/2010/03/02/tahir-ul-qadri-and-the-difficulty-of-reporting-on-fatwas/comment-page-1/#comment-23777 Sat, 06 Mar 2010 07:40:34 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/?p=12155#comment-23777 A big hype maker!
Changes colours between Sufism, scholarship, politics and what not. Lives a lavish life. Not a religious scholar from a seminary, hence not fit to issue fatwa. Calls himself Shikhul Islam! I dont know who gave him that title. Is he on par with Shikhul Islam Ibn-Tamiyah! Urdu poet Said about his likes:
Hawas Balaaye Minber hai tujhei rangeen bayaani ki
Haqeeata bhi teri soorat hai ik afsaanah khuani ki
(you are so desperate to make a colourful sermon on the pulpit;
even your advice sound like telling a romantic story)

May Allah bless you with modesty and sincerity.

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By: Jalaluddin http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/2010/03/02/tahir-ul-qadri-and-the-difficulty-of-reporting-on-fatwas/comment-page-1/#comment-23770 Fri, 05 Mar 2010 07:55:09 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/?p=12155#comment-23770 “there are levels deeper than which the analysis is no longer journalism but academic specialisation.”

I fully agree. However, I think journalists should ask themselves if their audiences have absorbed an accurate picture of reality through these ‘micro-reports’, and if not, adjust accordingly, at least in selecting which stories to report on. For example, an amazing number of educated people still seem to be totally unaware that many major Muslims leaders have loudly condemned terrorism. That’s clearly due to a lack of prominent reportage, so this should factor in when deciding whether to report on a fatwas that may not seem so prominent.

” ul-Qadri sound like the most influential Muslim scholar around and the first to come out with such a statement.”
Yes, Reuters got the balance right in this case. His supporters do tend to use off-putting, overblown language, yet he’s not an inconsequential fellow.

“On the Sufi angle, this is another one where brevity trumped background. Since most Sufis are Sunni but not all Sunnis are Sufis, we opted for just Sufi.”

This is problematic because:
(a) the ‘Who’ question is key in this sort of story; precision is necessary to gauge its importance and not enough has been provided. People must know which area of Islamdom his words carry weight in and this is determined by the prevalence of his school of thought, his reputation within it, and the geographical dispersion of the people who take him seriously.

(b) this confuses schools of jurisprudence with spiritual/psychological practice, two very different things.
When someone issues a fatwa, the school of law (‘Hanafi’ in this case) is what’s important. There are 8 schools identified in the Amman Message; these are the categories that all fatwas should be identified with as a matter of journalistic due diligence.

For a Muslim audience, I would have described him simply as a “Hanafi scholar” or, for a South Asian audeince, as a “Barelwi”. (All of the traditional schools are linked with sufi practice, so there’d be no need to mention it.) For a predominantly non-Muslim audience, I would have described him primarily as a “Sunni (Hanafi) scholar” and made mention of his sufi-friendliness in passing somewhere in the article.

“someone to put a decent list out on Wikipedia to make it available to a wider audience”
Personally, I’m surprised that it hasn’t been done yet, given how central it is to the questions that everyone asks about Islam and terrorism. Who do you think is the right ‘someone’? Muslim structures thus far seem too decentralized / uncoordinated to produce such a resource, though the efforts associated with Prince Ghazi are promising if not-quite-there yet. (Even if a Muslim think-tank did get its act together, there’s a risk that the list might not be seen as an objective compilation.) The academic efforts thus far are underwhelming. And I don’t think amateurs can produce such a list, not without the journalists providing the basic information as just described: reporting more widely on fatwas and providing specifics on the actors and their backgrounds. Given that it’s mainly a matter of compilation rather than analysis, I think it’s not necessarily outside the purview of journalism.

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By: Tom Heneghan http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/2010/03/02/tahir-ul-qadri-and-the-difficulty-of-reporting-on-fatwas/comment-page-1/#comment-23765 Thu, 04 Mar 2010 19:07:26 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/?p=12155#comment-23765 Jalaluddin, it’s probably not surprising that you give us higher marks for getting the details right than delving into the broader analysis. Getting the details right is the basis of our reporting, so if we can’t do that, we shouldn’t go further and analyse. That said, we will probably always disappoint some readers by not going deeper into the analylsis, but there are levels deeper than which the analysis is no longer journalism but academic specialisation. We try to explain as best we can, but we’re very aware of the limitations of the medium.

Our main concern with this story was to present the fatwa but avoid the hype, which almost made ul-Qadri sound like the most influential Muslim scholar around and the first to come out with such a statement.

On the Sufi angle, this is another one where brevity trumped background. Since most Sufis are Sunni but not all Sunnis are Sufis, we opted for just Sufi.

Thanks for the lists of fatwas and reactions. It’s interesting to see there are several out there, but disappointing to see how badly they’re presented. I second your plea for someone to put a decent list out on Wikipedia to make it available to a wider audience.

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