FaithWorld

Tiger Woods promises to wear Buddhist bracelet forever

By Reuters Staff
March 22, 2010
tiger woods

Tiger Woods pauses while delivering a statement after admitting cheating on his wife and taking a break from golf, 19 Feb 2010/Sam Greenwood

Rehabilitation and religion were the two themes Tiger Woods was most open about discussing in his first television interviews Sunday since revelations about his marriage infidelities emerged last November.  Woods has long been connected to Buddhism through his Thai mother and he said his detachment from the religion had been behind his fall from grace.

“Going against your core values, losing sight of it,” he said when asked how he lost control of his life. “I quit meditating, I quit being a Buddhist, and my life changed upside down.  I felt entitled, which I had never felt before. Consequently, I hurt so many people by my own reckless attitude and behavior.”

Woods wore a thin Buddhist bracelet, which he showed to Golf Channel viewers and said he would be wearing when he returned to golf at the U.S. Masters on April 8.  “It’s Buddhist, it’s for protection and strength and I certainly need that,” he said.

Given a number of celebrities in the U.S. have “discovered” religion at times of crises, Woods may find some skepticism about his readiness to be publicly associated with Buddhism now. But he discussed it in a video and text interview with Reuters in March 2008. He said he practiced meditation and went to a temple with his mother every  year.

Here are the Buddhist bracelet story, another news story on the interview, the full transcript and video of the Golf Channel interview and the full transcript and video of the ESPN interview.

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