FaithWorld

Film champions liberalism in conservative Egypt

By Reuters Staff
April 28, 2010
pyramids

The great Giza pyramids and the Sphinx on March 27, 2010/Amr Abdallah Dals

A new film exploring issues of sexual freedom, polygamy and individuality has drawn media praise in Egypt, but its liberal message remains on the margins in the country’s conservative society. The appearance of Rasayel El Bahr, or Messages from the Sea, in Egyptian theatres is the latest indication of an easing of censorship rules, which film critics say reflects government efforts to counter Islamism.

The film’s themes are striking in a country where the streets are dominated by the Islamic headscarf and where, analysts say, the state is battling against the rise of stricter versions of Islam emanating from Gulf states like Saudi Arabia.

In director Daoud Abdel Sayed’s story, Yehya, a young doctor who moves to coastal Alexandria and slowly shakes free of social norms, falls in love with Nora, who leads him to believe she is a prostitute. Viewers learn that Nora, as the second wife in a polygamous marriage, just sees herself this way. Polygamy is permitted in Egypt under Islamic sharia law.

Read the full story by Shaimaa Fayed here.

Follow FaithWorld on Twitter at RTRFaithWorld

Comments
One comment so far | RSS Comments RSS

We know that Polygyny(a man having multiple wives at a time) is permitted in Islam, Islam justifies that it is the best possible solution for a couple when the wife is infertile and the husband seeks an heir of his own, and seperation is not an option.. Then why not recognize polyandry (woman having multiple husbands) if man is not capable? http://www.lawisgreek.com/the-practicali ty-behind-polygyny-in-islamic-law/

Posted by LawIsGreek | Report as abusive
 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/