Young Americans more loyal to religion than Baby Boomers

By Reuters Staff
August 9, 2010

religion survey Younger Americans, between the ages of 36 to 50, are more likely to be loyal to religion than Baby Boomers, according to new research.

In a study published in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Philip Schwadel, of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, said this was true even though they were less likely than previous generations to have been brought up with a religion.

(Photo: A young woman sings in a choir at Redemption Camp in Floyd, Texas, June 17, 2009/Jessica Rinaldi)

He said the trend “is good news for those who worry about declining religious adherence.”

Schwadel attributed the younger generation’s overall loyalty to religion to a less staid and more innovative religious scene in America today, while religion in the past was more conservative, less diverse and stricter. If people are not happy with one religion now, they can easily switch to a different denomination or faith, he added. By contrast, Baby Boomers were a more rebellious generation and experienced the anti-establishment culture of the 1960s.

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