U.S. church-run hospitals provide higher quality care — Thomson Reuters study

By Reuters Staff
August 15, 2010

research briefCatholic and other church-owned systems are significantly more likely to provide higher quality performance and efficiency to the communities served than investor-owned systems, according to a Thomson Reuters analysis of the quality performance of 255 health systems in the United States.

Catholic health systems are also significantly more likely to provide higher quality performance to the communities served than secular not-for-profit health systems, it said. By contrast, investor-owned systems have significantly lower performance than all other groups.

“The findings of the study suggest a changing role for health system governance and leadership,” said Jean Chenoweth, senior vice president for performance improvement and 100 Top Hospitals programs at Thomson Reuters. “Our data suggest that the leadership of health systems owned by churches may be the most active in aligning quality goals and monitoring achievement of mission across the system.”

To learn more about the 100 Top Hospitals program, including the 100 Top Hospitals: Health System Benchmarks research, visit 100tophospitals.com.

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[...] higher quality performance and efficiency to the communities served than investor-owned systems, according to a Thomson Reuters analysis of the quality performance of 255 health systems in the United States. Catholic health systems are also significantly more likely to provide higher [...]

[...] vice president for performance improvement and 100 Top Hospitals programs at Thomson Reuters, says, “Our data suggest that the leadership of health systems owned by churches may be the most active [...]

[...] Reuters reports on a rather interesting find concerning the quality of care at different types of hospitals.The study by Thompson Reuters looked at 255 hospitals using the following criteria for measurement:Risk-adjusted mortality index (in-hospital)Risk-adjusted complications indexRisk-adjusted patient safety indexCore measures mean percent30-day risk-adjusted mortality rate for heart attack, heart failure, and pneumonia*30-day risk-adjusted readmission rate for heart attack, heart failure, and pneumonia*Severity-adjusted average length of stayHospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) score (patient rating of overall hospital performance)They reached the following conclusions:Catholic and other church-owned systems are significantly more likely to provide higher quality performance and efficiency to the communities served than investor-owned systems. Catholic health systems are also significantly more likely to provide higher quality performance to the communities served than secular not-for-profit health systems.Investor-owned systems have significantly lower performance than all other groups.Performance of other church-owned systems (non-Catholic) is not statistically different from either Catholic or not-for-profit systems.It makes sense that these church-run hospitals would provide better results.  After all, if they are providing this service for the reason any church should provide a service, it would be out of love and concern for their fellow human beings created in the image of God.  For nearly 2,000 years it has been Christians who have founded hospitals, cared for the sick, attended to plague victims, etc.While capitalism is a good economic system that takes human nature into account, for a motivation, it’s hard to beat a genuine transcendent concern for innocent human life.It would be interesting to see where government hospitals (like those in England) ranked compared to these others.  Given my three years experience with government health care in the UK, as well as 10 years under the military medical system, I’m guessing it would probably rank near a flat line…if not below the line.Socialist/government systems remove ALL motivation for diligence, hard work and quality–even the capitalistic ones.Note: Reader comments are reviewed before publishing, and only salient comments that add to the topic will be published. Profanity is absolutely not allowed and will be summarily deleted. Spam, copied statements and other material not comprised of the reader’s own opinion will also be deleted. [...]

[...] also interesting to note what a study by Reuters had to say last year in a report…  New York, 17 August (ENI/RNS)—Roman Catholic and other church-run health [...]

[…] find themselves sick, there would always be options for healing. Charity-run, locally-owned, and religiously-organized hospitals and health facilities have a long history of providing top quality healthcare. But state […]