FaithWorld

Fifty-two killed in raid on Iraqi Catholic church

By Reuters Staff
November 1, 2010

baghdad church 1

(Photo: Our Lady of Salvation Church in Baghdad, November 1, 2010/Mohammed Ameen)

Fifty-two hostages and police officers were killed when security forces raided a Baghdad church to free more than 100 Iraqi Catholics held by al Qaeda-linked gunmen, a deputy interior minister said on Monday.

Lieutenant General Hussein Kamal said 67 people were also wounded in the raid on the Syrian Catholic church, which was seized by guerrillas during Sunday mass in the bloodiest attack in Iraq since August. The death toll was many times higher than that given overnight in the hours after the raid.

baghdad church 2

(Photo: Bomb damage outside Our Lady of Salvation Church in Baghdad November 1, 2010/Mohammed Ameen)

The gunmen took hostages at the Our Lady of Salvation (Sayidat al-Najat) Church, one of Baghdad’s largest, and demanded the release of al Qaeda prisoners in Iraq and Egypt.  “This death toll is for civilians and security force members. We don’t differentiate between police and civilians. They are all Iraqis,” Kamal said, adding the number did not include dead attackers.

Iraq’s Christian minority has frequently been targeted by militants, with churches bombed and priests assassinated. Iraq has about 850,000 Christians (around 3% of the population), of which 400,000 are Catholics, mostly of the Chaldean and Syrian churches in full communion with Rome. Many Christians have fled the country or have been displaced internally since the U.S.-led invasion in 2003.

baghdad church 3

(Photo: Residents outside Our Lady of Salvation Church in Baghdad November 1, 2010/Mohammed Ameen)

Officials said the attackers threatened to kill the 120 hostages unless al Qaeda prisoners in Iraq and Egypt were freed.

Read the full story by Muhanad Mohammed here. See also Pope condemns “ferocious” attack on Baghdad church.

baghdad church 4

(Photo: Iraqi policemen stand guard outside Our Lady of Salvation Church in Baghdad November 1, 2010/Mohammed Ameen)

The attack came just a week after the Vatican concluded a two-week synod of bishops from the Middle East to discuss the situation of the Christian minorities there and suggest ways to support and defend them. Here is a selection of our report on that meeting:

Follow FaithWorld on Twitter at RTRFaithWorld

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/