FaithWorld

U.K. academic says Easter date can now be fixed

By Reuters Staff
April 18, 2011
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(The Last Supper, Leonardo da Vinci, 1498)

The Last Supper took place on a Wednesday — a day earlier than thought — and a date for Easter can now be fixed, according to a Cambridge University scientist aiming to solve one of the Bible’s most enduring contradictions.

Christians have marked Jesus’ final meal on Maundy Thursday for centuries but thanks to the rediscovery of an ancient Jewish calendar, Professor Colin Humphreys suggests another interpretation.

“I was intrigued by Biblical stories of the final week of Jesus in which no one can find any mention of Wednesday. It’s called the missing day,” Humphreys told Reuters. “But that seemed so unlikely: after all Jesus was a very busy man.”

His findings help explain a puzzling inconsistency between the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke, who said the Last Supper coincided with Passover and John, who said the meal took place before the Jewish holy day commemorating the Exodus from Egypt.

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The first of April is not favorable – it is the fool’s day. Even the pope John Paul II spent one more day here on earth, thanks to modern medicine, so as not to die exactly on April 1st. As for the determined researcher, he departed from a fundamental mistake – last supper. So, no matter what he found, it is flawy. Remember, Jesus could not be a catholic; catholicism – where the last supper only and exclusively belongs to – only began to gain shape about six or seven centuries later. Since there is enormous ignorance, and indoctrination is fertile as… a rabbit, I end up with this, which can suit almost everyone: be selective about the chocolate!

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