FaithWorld

Turkey to return confiscated properties to non-Muslim minorities

August 29, 2011

(Sumela Monastery, founded by Greek Orthodox Christians and now run by the state as a museum in the Black Sea coastal province of Trabzon, northeastern Turkey, August 15, 2010/Umit Bektas)

The Turkish government is to return properties confiscated from religious minorities since 1936, in a step seen addressing European Union concerns about the treatment of minorities in the EU candidate country. According to a decree published in Turkey’s Official Gazette at the weekend, property taken away from minority religious foundations under a 1936 declaration will be returned to them.

The decision was announced ahead of a dinner to break the Ramadan fast that Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan attended with representatives of the Christian and Jewish communities in Istanbul on Sunday evening.

Some of the seized properties were hospitals, schools and cemeteries. In the case of minority groups’ properties that were sold to third parties, the religious foundations will be paid the market value of the properties by the Treasury. Turkey confiscated billions of dollars worth of property belonging to Armenian and Greek foundations when they fell into disuse. The European Court of Human Rights ruled that these seizures were illegal.

Most of Turkey’s Christians fled in the upheaval of World War One and the ensuing War of Independence. Hundreds of thousands of Armenians were massacred and 1.5 million Greeks deported in a population exchange. There are now around 100,000 Christians of different denominations and some 25,000 Jews among Turkey’s overwhelmingly Muslim population of 74 million.

There is a dwindling community of around 2,500 Greeks in Istanbul, capital of the Greek Orthodox Byzantine Empire until the Ottoman conquest of 1453. Some 60,000 Armenians and 15,000 Syriac Orthodox also live in Turkey, along with several other smaller religious minorities.

A treaty with Western powers in 1923 allowed Istanbul’s non-Muslim communities to retain special education and property rights.

by Daren Butler in Istanbul

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