FaithWorld

Libya’s NTC head Jalil pledges to uphold Islamic law

By Reuters Staff
October 24, 2011

Leader of Libya's National Transitional Council, Mustafa Abdel Jalil, announces the liberation of Libya in Benghazi October 23, 2011/Esam Al-Fetori

Libya’s National Transitional Council leader Mustafa Abdel Jalil kneeled in prayer after taking the stand in a celebration of liberation on Sunday after 42 years of one-man rule by Muammar Gaddafi and promised to uphold Islamic law.

“We as a Muslim nation have taken Islamic sharia as the source of legislation, therefore any law that contradicts the principles of Islam is legally nullified,” he said.

Jalil thanked the Arab League, the United Nations, and the European Union for supporting the uprising which ended with Gaddafi’s death on Thursday.

“All the martyrs, the civilians and the army had waited for this moment. But now they are in the best of places … eternal heaven,” he said, shaking hands with supporters.

“The revolution began as a peaceful one. But it was faced with violence,” he told tens of thousands of Libyans gathered in the eastern city of Benghazi, where fighting against Gaddafi erupted in February.

For more on Libya’s liberation day, see Libya declares “liberation,” Gaddafi stays unburied

 

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This is a critical time for the NTC. If they actually intend to establish a truly Democratic system, they need to create a chasm between politics and religion. Both aspects of their societies are relevant, respected and recognized, yet separated, both have their bastions of stability and support. This separation of Mosque and State, is the binding structure that will allow (both), sure footing on sandy and sometimes unstable soil.

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