German court rules Muslim pupil cannot pray at school, cites tensions

By Alexandra Hudson
November 30, 2011

(Young boys study the Koran at the central mosque in Berlin's Kreuzberg district, October 30, 2001. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch)

A German court ruled on Wednesday that a Muslim student in Berlin cannot pray in the corridor of his high school even outside lesson time as it would disrupt the school. Germany’s Federal Administrative Court said in a statement its ruling applied only to this particular instance and took into account special circumstances at the school.

German media reported there were pupils belonging to five different faiths and different branches of Islam, which had caused tension in the past.

“The court has decided that…performing the prayer rite in the school corridor could exacerbate a threat which already exists to the peace of the school community,” the court said, adding the school was not able to organise a separate room for prayer. “By (peace of the school community) we mean an environment which is free of conflict and… which allows lessons to take place in an orderly manner.”

The court noted conflict had broken out among Muslim students themselves after accusations that the student’s prayer ritual was not in accordance with a particular teaching of the Koran.

The case dates back to 2007 when the student along with some of his peers organised a prayer session one break time in the school corridor. The students kneeled on their jackets and recited prayers.

via German court rules Muslim pupil cannot pray at school

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3 comments

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I agree with the school on this issue, and am glad that they clearly stressed the caveat that this is a one-off decision based on the specific situation.

Posted by justine184 | Report as abusive

I remember as a kid in public school being excused early once a week along with other Catholic kids to attend religious training at another facility.

If prayer is so important than why not just excuse the pupil to attend his prayers then return to school.

Personally I’ve always felt that Islam is an intentionally “showy” religion. A lot of emphasis is placed on what can be seen (prayers/head coverings/beards/etc) but little on what goes on behind closed doors.

More concerned with the outside of the cup instead of what is inside.

Posted by HAL.9000 | Report as abusive

Religion cannot succeed w/out indoctrinating &brainwashing kids.This should be the law of the land In Europe.Moslem fanatics should go back to Mecca & stay there.Too much damage has been done already to Europe & the rest of the world.If their religion was real they could just pray to allah for all us infidels to disappear & then they could have Europe to themselves.

Posted by RasputinSir | Report as abusive