FaithWorld

Factbox-Policies of Freedom and Justice Party of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood

By Reuters Staff
December 5, 2011

(Women holding umbrellas and covering themselves stand in line during rain under an election poster by Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood "The Freedom and Justice Party'" outside a polling station as they wait to cast their votes during parliamentary elections in Alexandria, November 28, 2011. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany)

The Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) gained most seats in the first round of Egypt’s first democratic parliamentary elections for six decades.

Following are some of the views espoused by the Brotherhood and the FJP on the economy, security, political reform, religion, culture and foreign policy, based on statements by members and the party programme:

POLITICS AND RELIGION

- FJP and Brotherhood officials say they want to build a modern, democratic state based on Islamic sharia law.

- The FJP says in its programme that legislation should be based on the principles of sharia and implemented with the agreement of a parliamentary majority.

- The programme talks of “spreading and deepening” the understanding of sharia as a way to guide individuals and society, echoing comments by officials who say they do not want to impose sharia on an unwilling population.

- It says followers of other religions would be governed by their own laws on religious matters.

- Asked whether the party would seek to make it a rule for Egyptian women to wear the Muslim veil, FJP Secretary-General Saad el-Katatni said: “I cannot draft a law that says an unveiled woman will be forbidden from this or that … (but) I must make her feel that her punishment is in the afterlife.” Most women in Egypt already wear a veil.

ECONOMY

- Broadly, Brotherhood leaders say the group supports a free-market economy with a strong private sector.

- Many Brotherhood members have big business interests, including in consumer goods such as furniture and clothing.

- They say they seek to emulate the Turkish experience in terms of economic growth with a focus on boosting manufacturing and exports, but say that does not mean they wish to follow Turkey’s political model.

- The group has said it seeks to gradually expand Islamic banking in Egypt as an alternative to commercial banking that would lure investors, but would leave both banking options available to consumers.

- Hassan Malek, one of the main financiers and business strategists of the Brotherhood, has said: “We want to attract as much foreign investment as possible… This needs a big role for the private sector.”

- Officials have tended to sidestep questions about whether the party would, for example, seek to ban alcohol, a move that would deter tourists, a major source of revenues and jobs.

- Katatni said the party might seek to ban alcohol for Egyptians but allow it for tourists on hotel beaches. Essam el-Erian, deputy FJP leader, said when asked about the issue that it would be a “fatal mistake” to damage the tourist industry.

- Hassan Malek, one of the main financiers and business strategists of the Brotherhood, said he had reservations about dealing with Qualified Industrial Zones, set up under a deal implemented in 2005 that allows Egypt to export from the zones to the United States free of tariffs and quotas provided products contain a certain percentage of Israeli inputs.

ISRAEL

- The Muslim Brotherhood is a vociferous critic of Israel. Although it long ago renounced violence as a means to bring change in Egypt, it says those facing occupation have the right to “resist by all means”. The Palestinian militant group Hamas sees the Brotherhood as a spiritual leader.

- The FJP’s programme refers to Israel as the “Zionist entity” and describes it as “a racist, colonising, expansionist and aggressive entity” and says the Palestinian issue is “the most serious Egyptian national security issue”.

- Without mentioning Egypt’s 1979 peace treaty with Israel, it says international agreements or treaties must have public support and all sides in such agreements must implement them or they can be reviewed. It says many deals reached under Egypt’s old order should be reviewed.

- Asked about the treaty, the FJP’s Erian said: “It is a fact we have a treaty. We are not going to end it.” But he said a new parliament and other new institutions could change attitudes in future if the other side violated it.

U.S. AID

- “Any country that relies on aid is a slave to others’ policies and Egypt’s will must be freed,” said Katatni, commenting on aid from the United States that has flowed into Egypt since Cairo signed the peace deal with Israel.

- “That does not mean that we want to cut relations with Washington… We don’t want aid which brings hegemony,” Katatni said.

- Egypt receives about $1.3 billion in U.S. military aid.

SECURITY SECTOR REFORM

The FJP’s programme, like others, calls for deep reform of the internal security forces whose crackdown on dissent in the Mubarak era fuelled the uprising against the president.

Early steps proposed by the FJP include:

- Sacking anyone proven to have been involved in killing, torture or bribery

- Moving anyone assessed to have committed less serious mistakes to jobs that will not have dealings with the public

- Recalling officers deemed to have had a good record but wrongfully dismissed

- Ensuring police academies include human rights training

CULTURE

- The FJP programme says it seeks “freedom of creativity and the protection of society’s ethics, propriety and customs”.

- On music and songs, it says they are for “enjoyment and recreation for the soul” but “are among the arts that have diminished and fallen and have become associated – in the minds of many – with transgressing of ethics and stirring desires.”

- The programme says: “The Egyptian song must be directed towards more ethical and creative horizons that are consistent with the society’s values and identity”

by Shaimaa Fayed in Cairo

via FACTBOX-Policies of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood’s party

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Draft Constitution for Egypt.

Suggested by:

Sabzali Khan Yusufzai
Author’s of True Democracy.
E-Mail .sayusufzai@gmail.com,or Khansabzali26@yahoo.com.

Keeping in view

· The suggestions of extraordinary power of President under the proposed Constitution resulting another dictatorship.
· The armies keen interest in sharing ruling power.
· To share the ruling power, better resources of income and high standard of life with all Citizens of Egypt.
· The demonstration/ Revolution was conducted/ participated and supported by the people of all field of life of Egypt.
· Muslim brother hood party has historically great influence in politics of Egypt.
· The conflict between Secular and religious groups/organizations.
· Many groups, Alliances and Political Parties of Egypt.

Therefore I suggest the following Articles to be added in the Constitution of Egypt.

Article-I Islamic Democratic republic of Egypt. (Name of State)

Article -II Arabic (State Language)

Article –III No law will be legislated against the true spirit of Islam.

Article – IV “Majles Shora” The Parliament of Egypt must be consisted on the representatives of the below mentioned 9 Groups of Citizens.

(P-I) THINKERS’ group of Citizens.

Like Philosophers, Authors, Judges, lawyers, Solicitors, Barristers at law, Legislators and Thinkers etc.
The frame of work of these Citizens is to provide justice and create laws, rules regulations & orders to prevail Justice in a community.
The Ministry of Law, justice and judiciary affairs are the concern Ministry of these Citizens.
11% Seats must be reserve in Majles-Shora for the elected representatives of this group of Citizens
(P-II) CURATIVE group of Citizens.

Like Doctors, Physicians, Surgeons, Chemists, Druggists, Dentists, Nurses, (Male & Female).
The frame of work and responsibilities of these Citizens of the Community are to care and cure human health with all Pallor, environmental, Hospital and Clinic activities etc.
The Ministry of Health, environmental and Hospital/Clinic affairs are the concern Ministry of these Citizens.
11% Seats must be reserve in Majles-Shora for the elected representatives of this group of Citizens

(P-III) TECHNICAL group of Citizens.

Like Scientists, Engineers, Planners, Architects, Carpenters, Cobblers, Jewelers workers, professional Drivers, Watch makers, Locksmiths, Masons, Plumbers, Gold smiths, Weavers, Sculptors, Surveyors, Draftsman, Tailors, Tracers, Designers, Blacksmiths, Painters, Joiners, Darnels, etc.
The frame of work of these Citizens is technical activities, experiments, inventions and providing technical services to a Community.
The Ministry of Transportation, Communication, Science and Technology the concern Ministry of these Citizens.
11% Seats must be reserve in Majles-Shora for the elected representatives of this group of Citizens

P-IV) INSTRUCTIVE group of Citizens.

Like Teachers, Lecturers, religious and moral Preachers, Professors, Students above 18 years age, Educator, Moralists, Scholars (Male & Female). Etc.
The frame of work of these citizens is education, religion, spiritual, and moral activities along with all types of humanitarian services /activities.
The Ministry of Education, and Religious affairs etc are the concern Ministry of these Citizens.
11% Seats must be reserve in Majles-Shora for the elected representatives of this group of Citizens

(P-V) CULTIVATOR group of Citizens.

Like Cultivator, Farmers, Tenants, Agriculture Officers and Field Assistants, Vegetable Sellers. Bread makers, Shepherd and Milk men etc.
All type of cultivation and agriculture concerned activities is the frame of work of these Citizens.
The Ministry of Agriculture, Cultivation, Forest, Fertilizers, Food and raw material affairs are the concern Ministry of these Citizens.
11% Seats must be reserve in Majles-Shora for the elected representatives of this group of Citizens

(P-VI) LABOR group of CITIZENS.

Like all type of labors, Coolies, Millers, Cooks, Sculptors, domestics servants, Clerks, all ordinary workers (male & femal0.
All activities pertaining to laboring, serving and all ordinary works, which are taking place in the various fields of life, is the frame of work of these Citizens
The Ministry of Labors, Manpower and ordinary Workers affairs are the concern Ministry of these Citizens.
11% Seats must be reserve in Majles-Shora for the elected representatives of this group of Citizens

.
(P-VII) PROTECTIVE group of CITIZENS.

Like Army, Air force, Navy, police, Rangers, Malaysia, Scout, Traffic police, Security guards, Firefighters (Male & Female) etc.
All those activities, which are taking, place for the security, safety and guard of Citizens is the frame of work of these Citizens.

The Ministry of internals and Externals Defense, Security and Law implementation affairs are the concern Ministry of these Citizens.
11% Seats must be reserve in Majles-Shora for the elected representatives of this group of Citizens

(P-VIII) ENTERTAINMENT/information providers.

Like Artists of T.V. /Drama/Film, and its writers. Dancers, Singers, musicians, Media concern Citizens Professional players, Jugglers, Astrologers, Editors and publishers of news papers etc (Male &Female)
All such activities through which entertainment/information could be provided to the Citizens is the frame of work of these Citizens.
The Ministry of information, Culture and entertainment affairs is the concern Ministry of these Citizens.
11% Seats must be reserve in Majles-Shora for the elected representatives of this group of Citizens

(P-IX) Elite/ Resourceful group of citizens.
Like: – Rich people, “whose assets exceeding 3 millions Dollars” Industrialists, Capitalists, Land Lords, Bankers, Traders, Sheikh etc.
The frame of work of these citizens are investment, Trade, Banking and Industries.
The Ministry of Commerce, Trade, Investment, Banking, Finance and fiscal affairs etc.
Keeping in view Justice the 11% Seats must also be reserve in Majles-Shora for the elected representatives of this group of Citizens

Article-V – Zone or Constituency.
The State of Egypt may be divided in to various Zones or constituencies; or according to the population, as such each Zone/Constituency would be consisted of the above-mentioned nine groups of Citizens. So during elections each group would be in the position to nominate their own candidates for their own concern group.
There may be so many candidates in one group but only one of them would be elected, as a result, Nine candidates would be elected in a Zone or an Constituency.

Article-VI- Polling Stations.
All Polling Stations of the Country in each Constituency would be consisted in to nine Booths and each Booth would be assigned to the above mentioned each group in each Constituency.

Majles Shora.
All Representatives who are elected under this group-wise election would be the Members of Majles Shora/Parliament. As such the Egypt’s Majles Shora/Parliament would be composed of 27×9= 243 Members (Flexible). As such, each group (Above mentioned 9 Groups) would be in strength of 27 Members in Majles Shora/Parliament.

Article-VII- Type of Government.
It depends upon the Majles Shora/Parliament that what type of government they recommends. There may be Presidential type of Government, where the President will govern the Ministry of Finance and foreign affairs and in the Parliamentary type of government, the Prime Minister will govern the Ministry of foreign affairs and the Finance Ministry will be under the control of President.

Article-VIII-Cabinet.
The representatives of each group in Majles Shora /Parliament will nominate or elect their own Minister for their own concerned Ministry / Department and each Minister will be responsible not only to Majles Shora/Parliament but also to Prime Minister regarding their own concern frame of work as mentioned above against each.

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